Past Events

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Stigma & Immigrant Entrepreneurship: Black September, Ethnic Enclaves, & New Venture Performance in Jordan

Monday, April 25, 2022
2:00pm - 3:15pm
Hybrid Event

Dodd Center for Human Rights - Room 162 & Zoom

About This Workshop:

The Business and Human Rights Workshop is dedicated to the development and discussion of works-in-progress and other non-published academic research. Below find the abstract for a preview of the paper. Please register for a link to read Prof. Ryan Cole's paper, the focus of this workshop. 

Prior research on immigrant entrepreneurship has largely overlooked the difficulties faced by stigmatized immigrant groups and the strategies that such immigrant groups can undertake to improve new venture performance. To address this issue, we examine immigrant entrepreneurship in Jordan. We find that stigmatized immigrant entrepreneurs in Jordan are more negatively affected by government practices than native and non-stigmatized immigrant entrepreneurs. Moreover, we find that stigmatized entrepreneurs can partially mitigate these effects by founding their ventures in established ethnic enclaves where entrepreneurs can access brokers with social ties that can help overcome discrimination. Empirically, we examine this phenomenon using data on new venture performance of 8756 entrepreneurs in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan from 2003 to 2013 and supplemented with 60 qualitative interviews.

Presenter:

Prof. Ryan Coles,
UConn School of Business

Discussant:

Prof. Michael Rubin,
UConn Human Rights Institute,
Schools of Engineering & Business

This workshop will be hosted both in-person and on Zoom. Please register regardless of the modality you wish to join. The workshop will not be recorded.

This event is sponsored by the Business and Human Rights Initiative, a partnership by Dodd Human Rights Impact, the UConn School of Business, & Human Rights Institute. 

Theatre & Human Rights: The Politics of Dramatic Form

Thursday, April 21, 2022
12:30pm - 1:50pm
Virtual Event

Presenter

Gary M. English,
Board of Trustees Distinguished Professor
UConn School of Fine Arts - Dramatic Arts

Host

Robin Greeley, Associate Professor of Art History

Panelists

Asif Majid, Assistant Professor, Dramatic Arts & Human Rights
Glenn Mitoma, Director, Dodd Impact
Sebastian Wogenstein, Associate Professor, German Studies

About This Event

Join us for a presentation of research that develops a theoretical foundation and methodology for how theatre and human rights intersect, and demonstrates how various dramatic forms interrogate human rights questions from within the specific perspective of Theatre as a discipline. While human rights research and programming often employ the arts as "representations" of atrocities--abusive political, social and economic practices--this study focuses on the various types of dramatic form and structure as uniquely positioned to investigate important questions in human rights theory and practice. The use of Theatre will be positioned as a method of examination rather than emphasize the more limited, however important purposes the arts serve to raise consciousness or offer commentary that accompany other, often considered more primary, modes of analysis.

About the Research Program on Arts & Human Rights

New for 2022, the Research Program on Arts & Human Rights explores how the arts can promote the full exercise of human rights and the consolidation of a democratic culture. The arts not only make human rights visible. They also advance democratic thinking as they help us imagine new futures and open unique spaces for dialogue and debate, ushering us into novel modes of experience that provide concrete grounds for rethinking our relationship to one another. Thus, the arts can act as a powerful means of sustaining individual and collective reflection on human rights, and of linking individual and collective public experience, social belonging and citizenship.

Our guiding concepts:

  • Art makes visible human rights, and their violation, helping us combat injustice;
  • Art strengthens mutual recognition, opening new spaces for dialogue and debate;
  • Art forges new potential futures, helping us envision a more moral and just society.

This workshop will be hosted on Zoom. Please register to receive login information.

Coupling & Coupling Compromises in Supplier Factories’ Responses to Worker Activism

Thursday, March 31, 2022
12:00pm - 1:15pm
Virtual Event

About This Workshop:

The Business and Human Rights Workshop is dedicated to the development and discussion of works-in-progress and other non-published academic research. Read below for the abstract of Prof. Jodi Short's upcoming paper, the focus of this workshop. 

Many companies have adopted corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies in response to activist pressure, but ensuring the implementation of these policies is challenging. Recognizing the paucity of research on the effect of contentious activism on companies’ coupling of CSR policies and practices in the private politics and (de)coupling literatures, we posit that companies engage in “coupling compromises” when faced with such institutional pressure—improving their practices and more tightly coupling them with CSR policies in the domain contested by activists, but relaxing the coupling of policy and practice in competing CSR domains. Furthermore, we theorize that the nature and extent of coupling compromises can be explained by the interaction of activism with organizational structures that construct managerial perceptions of issue salience and internal frictions to change. We test our theory in the context of global supply chain factories’ compliance with CSR policies on working conditions when they face local worker activism. Analyzing 3,495 audits of 2,352 factories in 114 Chinese cities from 2012 to 2015, we find that worker activism over wages-and-benefits issues pushes factories to improve their wages-and-benefits practices and couple them more tightly with CSR policies, but these factories concurrently loosen the coupling between policy and practice in the domain of occupational health and safety. Both effects are stronger in factories with organizational structures that foreground the salience of wages and benefits issues and mitigate friction to changing organizational practices. These findings make significant contributions to the literatures on private politics, (de)coupling, and global supply chain labor practices.

Paper - Coupling & Coupling Compromises in Supplier Factories' Responses to Worker Activism

Access to the full paper is available in advance below, courtesy of Jodi Short and co-authors Yanhua Bird, Boston University Questrom School of Business, and Michael W. Toffel, Harvard Business School.

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Presenter:

Prof. Jodi Short, UC Hastings Law

Discussant:

Prof. Vivek Soundararajan, University of Bath

This event will not be recorded.

This event is sponsored by the Business and Human Rights Initiative, a partnership by Dodd Human Rights Impact, the UConn School of Business, & Human Rights Institute. 

Environmental Rights in Cultural Context – Perspectives from Law and Anthropology

Tuesday, March 22, 2022
2:00pm - 3:30pm
Hybrid Event

Join us!

In Person:
This event will be held in-person with the option to join by WebEx. The Colloquium will be hosted in the Heritage Room of Homer Babbidge Library, HBL 4-214.

By WebEx:
Use the following link to join the meeting room at 2:00pm: http://s.uconn.edu/hbl4420webex
There is no password necessary to join; simply click 'Join Meeting' on the page to be connected.

About This Event:

Environmental rights, such as the right to a healthy or clean environment, are experiencing increasing recognition within domestic constitutions as well as international human rights instruments and institutions. In parallel, more ecocentric approaches promote so-called rights of nature. Using methods of law and anthropology, this talk will assess to what extent such rights respond to environmental stress of local communities exposed, for instance, to large scale mining, hydro dams or climate change.

Presenter:

Dirk Hanschel studied law at the Universities of Marburg and Heidelberg, Germany, as well as the London School of Economics (LSE), before taking his doctoral/post-doctoral degrees at the University of Mannheim, Germany. He furthermore holds a Master of Comparative Law (Mannheim/Adelaide). After working as a reader at the University of Aberdeen for around two years, he became a professor of German, European and International Public Law at the University of Halle, Germany, in 2015. His research focuses inter alia on topics of environmental law and human rights, topics of comparative constitutional law (such as federalism), the law of international organizations, as well as law and anthropology. In 2019 he became a Fellow at the Max-Planck-Institute for Social Anthropology, Halle, where he conducts an interdisciplinary project on "Environmental Rights in Cultural Context", together with a group of doctoral and post-doctoral scholars. In autumn 2021 he was appointed Martin Flynn Global Law Professor at UConn Law School.

The Colloquium is sponsored by the Human Rights Institute, the School of Law, and the Connecticut/Baden Württemberg Human Rights Research Consortium.

This event is hybrid. We encourage you to join us in person or to join us by WebEx. It will be recorded.

Suffer the Children: A Theoretical Foundation for the Human Rights of the Child

Wednesday, April 6, 2022
4:00pm - 5:30pm
Hybrid Event

Join us!

In Person:
This event will be held in-person with the option to view  by livestream.
The Colloquium will be hosted in the Konover Auditorium in The Dodd Center for Human Rights - DODD 166.

Livestream:
Use the following link to join the livestream at 4:00pm: http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/uyrei
We welcome those with UConn Google accounts to join our Google Chat space to comment and ask questions during the event.

About This Event:

Join us for a talk by longtime member of the Research Program on Economic and Social Rights Richard P. Hiskes, whose widely acclaimed new book addresses the centrality of social and economic rights within a broader discussion of why taking children's human rights seriously turns conventional human rights theory upside down. The book establishes the theoretical foundation for prioritizing social and economic rights in the name of children’s human rights. Read more about the book here.

About The Author:

Richard P. Hiskes is Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Human Rights at the University of Connecticut. As a founding faculty member of the Human Rights Institute (HRI) he served as Associate Director and Director of Undergraduate Programs, including the Human Rights Major. He was Editor of the Journal of Human Rights for many years, and twice selected as President of the Human Rights Section of the American Political Science Association (APSA).

He is the author of many books and articles in political theory generally and human rights theory in particular. His human rights work focuses on the theory of environmental human rights and on the human rights of children. His 2009 book, The Human Right to a Green Future: Environmental Rights and Intergenerational Justice (Cambridge), won the 2010 award for the best book in human rights from the American Political Science Association. His most recent book is Suffer the Children: A Theoretical Foundation for the Human Rights of the Child (Oxford, 2021).

This event is sponsored by the Research Program on Economic & Rights at the Human Rights Institute (HRI), the Collaboratory on School & Child Health at the Institute for Collaboration on Health, Intervention, and Policy (InCHIP), and the Department of Human Development & Family Sciences (HDFS).

About the Research Program on Economic & Social Rights at HRI

The Economic & Social Rights Group (ESRG) is an interdisciplinary monthly gathering of faculty and graduate students who meet to share ongoing research and to discuss current scholarship around economic and social rights. It is the central to the mission of the Research Program on Economic & Social Rights. The Research Program on Economic & Social Rights brings more than a dozen UConn faculty together with over 30 affiliated scholars from across the United States and Canada. Together, we have generated numerous graduate and undergraduate courses, several edited volumes, multiple co-authored articles, and the National Science Foundation-funded Socio-Economic Rights Fulfillment Index (SERF Index).

About the Collaboratory on School & Child Health at InCHIP

The mission of the Collaboratory on School and Child Health (CSCH) is to facilitate innovative and impactful connections across research, policy, and practice arenas to advance equity in school and child health. CSCH is committed to anti-racist work that prioritizes inclusion, reduces disparities, and creates systemic change.

CSCH serves as a central resource to University and external partners engaged in efforts that inform healthy, safe, supportive, and engaging environments for all children. The Collaboratory strives to create a positive environment that supports communication, knowledge sharing, and collaborative work among a diverse network of members in pursuit of this shared aim. Our collaborations intentionally use an inclusive, team- and relationship-based approach to broaden capacity for interconnected and cross-disciplinary projects that tackle the most pressing and complex issues in school and child health.

About the Department of Human Development & Family Sciences

The Department of Human Development & Family Sciences (HDFS) focuses its research, teaching, and public engagement on a multidisciplinary understanding of 1) healthy development and wellbeing of individuals and families over the lifespan, 2) interactions and processes within families, and 3) individuals and families in societal and cultural contexts.

We are committed to excellence in research, teaching, and public engagement through our core values of individualized mentoring, innovation and leadership, diversity and equity, and applied/translational science.

Using International Human Rights to Counter Urban Displacement and Advance Rights in Cities

Friday, March 4, 2022
12:30pm - 2:00pm
Virtual Event

About This Event:

In the second meeting of the Economic & Social Rights Group for Spring 2022, we welcome Jackie Smith, Professor of Sociology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Smith will discuss a new white paper, Pittsburgh’s Affordable Housing Crisis: Is Privatization the Solution?, which she wrote with colleagues involved in Pittsburgh’s Human Rights City Alliance. She will discuss how the project emerged from the work of a diverse alliance of human rights organizers and how it contributes to ongoing local and translocal movement-building to advance housing as a human right. It also demonstrates important roles for networks of university- and neighborhood-based activists to play in advancing human rights in cities and communities. The white paper is available to read here, courtesy of Smith and her colleagues.

Presenter:

Jackie Smith’s research focuses on how globalization impacts people and communities, and how social movements for the environment, health, and economic justice have advanced transformative struggles. She has documented long-term trends in transnational social movement organizations and coalitions, in addition to research on connections between global politics and activism in cities and communities. Smith is currently engaged in participatory research with Pittsburgh and with national human rights organizers and engaged in work to connect municipalities with United Nations human rights work.

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This event is virtual and will be hosted on Zoom. Click the link above to register to attend. The event will be recorded.

The Economic & Social Rights Group (ESRG) is an interdisciplinary monthly gathering of faculty and graduate students who meet to share ongoing research and to discuss current scholarship around economic and social rights. It is the central to the mission of the Research Program on Economic & Social Rights.

The Research Program on Economic & Social Rights brings more than a dozen UConn faculty together with over 30 affiliated scholars from across the United States and Canada. Together, we have generated numerous graduate and undergraduate courses, several edited volumes, multiple co-authored articles, and the National Science Foundation-funded Socio-Economic Rights Fulfillment Index (SERF Index).

Russia’s Crackdown on Religious Minorities, Journalists, & Human Rights Defenders

Tuesday, March 8, 2022
12:00pm - 2:00pm
Virtual Event

About This Event:

Join us for a discussion on the escalating persecution of religious minorities, journalists, and human rights defenders currently under way in Russia. Over the past several years, Russian authorities have labeled Jehovah’s Witnesses as “extremist” organizations and used anti-extremism laws to launch a campaign of arrests, harassment, and intimidation. During this event, we’ll explore the history and current reality of this case of religious persecution and hear first-hand accounts from community members.

Dr. Zoe Knox of the University of Leicester will deliver the keynote address, followed by reflections from targeted members of the Russian Jehovah's Witness community. Glenn Mitoma, Director of Dodd Impact, will moderate.

Keynote Speaker:

Zoe Knox is Associate Professor of Modern Russian History at the University of Leicester. Her research explores issues of religious tolerance and intolerance in the modern world, in Russia and beyond. Her publications include Russian Society and the Orthodox Church: Religion in Russia after Communism (Routledge, 2005); Jehovah’s Witnesses and the Secular World: From the 1870s to the Present (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018); and Voices of the Voiceless: Religion, Communism, and the Keston Archive (Baylor University Press, 2019), co-edited with J. deGraffenried.

Panelists:

Dmitri Antsybor, Kirill Kravchenko, & Aleksandr Tsvetkov

Moderator:

Glenn Mitoma, Director of Dodd Impact

This event is virtual and will be hosted on Zoom. Click the link above to register to attend. This event may be recorded.

Business, Human Rights, & the Triple Planetary Crisis

Thursday, March 10, 2022
12:00pm - 1:15pm
Virtual Event

About This Workshop:

The Business and Human Rights Workshop is dedicated to the development and discussion of works-in-progress and other non-published academic research. Read below for the abstract of Prof. Sara Seck's upcoming paper, the focus of this workshop. The full paper is available to view and download below in advance of the workshop.

According to the United Nations, the world is facing a triple planetary crisis of climate change, nature (biodiversity) loss, and pollution and waste, with the most egregious consequences felt by those least responsible. These crises are also intertwined: nature-based solutions are promoted as climate change solutions even as heat domes fuel forest fires; extraction of minerals for green energy solutions negatively impacts biodiversity and creates pollution and waste; and carbon major companies are also among the largest producers of plastic pollution. International human rights law is increasingly grappling with environmental rights and responsibilities, as evidenced by the work of special rapporteurs on the environment and on toxic substances, among others. This paper will consider how business and human rights instruments could help to guide solutions to triple planetary crisis that are attentive to the need to reduce overconsumption by the rich while supporting equity and resilience of those most vulnerable to planetary crisis.

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Presenter:

Prof. Sara Seck, Dalhousie University

Discussant:

Prof. Chiara Macchi, Wageningen University

This event will not be recorded.

This event is sponsored by the Business and Human Rights Initiative, a partnership founded by Dodd Human Rights Impact, the UConn School of Business, and the Human Rights Institute. 

Tracking Rights Fulfillment in the Human Rights Measurement Initiative

Thursday, February 24, 2022
3:00pm - 4:30pm EST
Virtual Event

About This Event:

In this month’s workshop, we feature the Human Rights Measurement Initiative (HRMI), co-founded by Susan Randolph, Emerita Professor of Economics at UConn.

HRMI is a global collaborative venture between human rights practitioners, researchers, academics, and other supporters to measure performance on 13 key human rights metrics internationally. In this workshop, the HRMI team will provide an overview of the methodology underpinning their innovative metrics, demonstrate the rights tracker (a key tool of their impact strategy), and highlight several new endeavors.

Presenters:

Anne-Marie Brook, Co-Founder and Vision & Strategy Lead (based at Motu Economic and Public Policy Research Institute in New Zealand)

Annie Watson, Children's Rights Co-Lead (based at Middle Georgia State University)

Chad Clay, Co-Founder and Methodology Research and Design Lead (based at University of Georgia)

Elizabeth Kaletski, Children's Rights Co-Lead (based at Ithaca College)

Matt Rains, Civil and Political Rights Lead (based at University of Georgia)

Stephen Bagwell, Economic and Social Rights Team (based at University of Missouri-St. Louis)

Susan Randolph, Co-founder and Economic and Social Rights Lead (based in Connecticut and Oregon

This event is virtual and will be hosted on Zoom. Click the link above to register to attend. The workshop will be recorded.

This event is sponsored by the Human Rights Research and Data Hub (HuRRD) at the Human Rights Institute. The Hub seeks to advance human rights research at UConn by supporting faculty and student projects and providing students the opportunity to develop research and data analysis skills that will advance their careers after graduation.

Human Rights Film+ Series: Tacheles – The Heart Of The Matter

Monday, March 28, 2022
3:30pm - 4:45pm
Virtual Film Discussion

Schedule:

Please watch the film before the discussion. A link to view the film will be sent to registrants in advance. Register to receive the link.

3:30pm - Discussion with filmmaker Jana Matthes, Sebastian Wogenstein (Center for Judaic Studies), and James Coltrain (Digital Media & Design).
Yaar Harell, the main protagonist of the film, will also join us. Moderated by Heather Elliott-Famularo (Digital Media & Design). 

This event has been rescheduled to March 28, 2022 from November 16, 2021.

About the Film:

The Human Rights Film+ Series presents Tacheles - The Heart of the Matter, written and directed by Jana Matthes & Andrea Schramm (Germany 2020).

Synopsis: In this moving documentary, we follow the story of Yaar, a young Israeli living in Berlin who is rebelling against his Jewish identity. He accuses his father of suffering from the Holocaust although he never experienced it firsthand. In order to face his own family history, Yaar decides to engage with the Holocaust in a new way: via a computer game. Together with his two German friends, he creates a 1940s Germany in which Jews can defend themselves and Nazis can act humanely. His father is shocked. “Tacheles – The Heart of the Matter” shows how the trauma of the survivors affects the third generation. By blurring the truth and switching the roles of victims and perpetrators - can anyone cope with their own history? Is reconciliation possible with a Computer Game?

Co-sponsors: Human Rights Institute, Dodd Impact, Digital Media and Design, Center for Judaic Studies & Contemporary Jewish Life