Course Offerings

Undergraduate

Spring 2024 Course Offerings: Major and Minor

Institutions and Laws

HRTS 2800.001: Human Rights in the United States
TTH 9:30-10:45am
Asmita Aasavari

Sociological analyses of human rights issues in the United States, including economic, racial, and gender justice; prisoners' rights and capital punishment; the role of the United States in international human rights agreements and treaties; and struggles on behalf of human rights. Formerly offered as HRTS/SOCI 3831.

HRTS 2800.002: Human Rights in the United States
TTH 3:30-4:45pm
Asmita Aasavari

Sociological analyses of human rights issues in the United States, including economic, racial, and gender justice; prisoners' rights and capital punishment; the role of the United States in international human rights agreements and treaties; and struggles on behalf of human rights. Formerly offered as HRTS/SOCI 3831.

HRTS 3055: Theory and Practice of International Criminal Justice
Online Asynchronous
Predrag Dojcinovic

International humanitarian and criminal law; genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression, and theories of individual criminal responsibility.

History, Philosophy, & Theory

HRTS 2100W: Human Rights Social Change
Monday 5:30-8:00pm
Cesar Abadia

Interdisciplinary exploration of the dynamic intersection between human rights and struggles for social change in a variety of contexts. Emphasis on how history, theory, and practice influence the power dynamics that promote or undermine human rights through social change. CA 2. CA 4-INT. 

HRTS 2200: Introduction to Genocide Studies
TTH 9:30-10:45am
James Waller  

Interdisciplinary introduction to the study of genocide as an historical, legal, social, political, and conceptual phenomenon, including response, prevention, and commemoration efforts. CA 2. CA 4-INT. 

Course Flyer

HRTS 2300.001: Engineering for Human Rights
W 3:35-6:00pm
Davis Chacon Hurtado

Foundational concepts of human rights and engineering ethics from a global perspective. Discussions of the role of engineering in society from human rights and different ethical perspectives. Principles of “Engineering for human rights” on distributive justice, participation, consideration of duty bearers, accountability, and indivisibility of rights. Case study analysis of engineering projects for human rights impacts. CA 2. 

HRTS 2300.002: Engineering for Human Rights
W 3:35-6:00pm
Desen Ozkan

Foundational concepts of human rights and engineering ethics from a global perspective. Discussions of the role of engineering in society from human rights and different ethical perspectives. Principles of “Engineering for human rights” on distributive justice, participation, consideration of duty bearers, accountability, and indivisibility of rights. Case study analysis of engineering projects for human rights impacts. CA 2. 

HRTS 3207: Genocide after the Second World War
TTH 11:00-12:15pm
John Dunn 

Genocide is one of the most extreme things human beings do to (and with) each other. We tend to think of genocide as a behavioral anomaly; so why does it keep happening? This course examines many of the genocides of the last century from a historical and interdisciplinary perspective. We trace the experiences of victims and survivors, the behavior of perpetrators, and the responses of the international community through historical cases. Those cases include the Holocaust and the genocides in Cambodia, Rwanda, the former Yugoslavia, and Darfur. In addition, we look at issues of justice and accountability, gender, memory and trauma, and the development of genocide as a legal and scholarly idea.

Applications & Methods

HRTS 2150: Devising Theatre for Social Justice I
Fr 10:00-12:30pm
Asif Majid

Making theatre without a pre written script to address a social justice topic of interest, moving from initial stimulus to concluding performance. Students will center a contemporary issue of social justice while developing theatre making skills, emphasizing collaborative co creation, small group work, and the development and presentation of a range of performance forms. CA 1. 

** This course is open to all students from all majors. No theatre experience is required or expected; all are welcome. Students from beyond Dramatic Arts are particularly encouraged to register. Feel free to contact the course professor with any questions (Asif Majid: asif.majid@uconn.edu). **

HRTS 3149W: Human Rights Through Film
W 3:35pm-6:05pm
Catherine Masud

Human rights-related issues explored via the cinematic medium. Both the substantive content and the technical aspects of the films will be analyzed through a combination of lecture, viewing, and group discussion. 

HRTS 3252: Corporate Social Responsibility and Accountability
M 5:00-7:45pm Online Blended
Gerlinde Berger-Walliser

This course provides an introduction to the human rights implications of multinational enterprises’ global operations. Students learn how to assess corporate social impact through a human rights framework, consider the challenges of regulating the human rights impacts of global business, analyze international policy responses, and evaluate the effectiveness of different approaches to enforcing human rights standards for corporations. 

HRTS 3254: Business Solutions for Societal Challenges
TTH 3:30-4:45pm
Heidi Bailey

This course provides an introduction to market-based solutions to social and human rights challenges. Students learn how to identify societal challenges from a human rights perspective and business’s role in addressing these challenges. Students will assess the modalities that businesses can adopt to generate positive social impact and will critically analyze business responses to societal challenges. 

HRTS 3540: Topics in Human Rights Practice - ‘Media’ted Human Rights: Gender, Race and Coloniality
TTH 12:30-1:45pm
Carmel Christy Kattithara Joseph  

In the media saturated environment we live in, our perception about various issues, including those concerning human rights are shaped and negotiated through diverse media forms. This introductory course aims to equip students with a critical lens to understand the institution of media, human rights discourse and representational practices around it.

Course Flyer

HRTS 3641: Human Rights Archives II: Visual Storytelling Practices
F 12:10-3:10pm
Catherine Masud

The use of human rights archival materials in documentary storytelling. Students will be trained in different documentary techniques and storytelling approaches working with oral history narratives and archival materials. This is the second part of a two-semester unit addressing a common theme. Part I is not a prerequisite for Part II. 

Electives 

HRTS 2263: Women, Gender, and Violence
MW 1:25-2:15pm Hybrid
Elva Orozco Mendoza

Discussion of various forms of gendered violence in the United States and in a global context. Physical, sexual, emotional and structural violence; social, political and personal meanings of gendered violence; special emphasis on women. 

HRTS 2450: Human Rights in Latin America
TTH 12:30-1:45pm
Anne Gebelein

Fundamental concepts and recurrent challenges of human rights in Latin America. 

HRTS 2830: Class, Power, and Inequality
MWF 10:10-11:00am
Bhoomi Thakore 

Inequality and its consequences in contemporary societies. Formerly offered as HRTS/SOCI 3421. 

HRTS 3209: Sustainable Energy in the 21st Century
TTH 11:00-12:15pm
Oksan Bayulgen

Political, socioeconomic, environmental, science and engineering challenges of energy sources; comparison of feasibility and sustainability of energy policies around the world. 

HRTS 3221: Latinos/as and Human Rights
TTH 11:00-12:15am Online
Emma Amador

Latino/a issues related to human, civil and cultural rights, and gender differences. 

HRTS 3298.001: Sports and Human Rights
TTH 2:00-3:15pm
John Dunn 

Why are athletes so often at the forefront of struggles for rights and justice? Why are sporting events so often sites where people try to claim their human rights, where others have their rights violated, and where regimes try to cover over their human rights records? If “it’s just a game” then why are the stakes so high? This course examines the intersections between human rights activism and violations and the world of sports in the past and the present. Potential topics include mega-sporting events, sports-washing, business and labor practices, athlete activism, performance enhancing drug use, participation of transgender athletes, youth sporting, and sports and development.  

HRTS 3298.002: Variable Topics - Performance and Islam
TTH 2:00-3:15pm
Asif Majid

How does Islam manifest in performance? What role does performance play in the lives of those who practice it, regardless of their levels of religiosity? This course takes an intermediate to advanced look at the intersection of Islam and performance in multiple societies, emphasizing social and staged performances by Muslim artists, comedians, and lay people themselves. Students will learn to critique and question their own assumptions about how the faith and those who practice it are represented socially, politically, and performatively, leaving this course with a deeper understanding of the complexities of studying Islam as it appears on and off stage.

** This course is open to all students from all majors. No theatre experience is required or expected; all are welcome. Students from beyond Dramatic Arts are particularly encouraged to register. Feel free to contact the course professor with any questions (Asif Majid: asif.majid@uconn.edu). **

HRTS 3563: African American History to 1865
MW 3:35-4:25pm
Dexter Gabriel 

History of African-American people to 1865, from their West African roots, to their presence in colonial America, through enslavement and emancipation. Adaptation and resistance to their conditions in North America. Contributions by black people to the development of the United States. 

HRTS 3575: Human Rights, Digital Media, Visual Culture
TTH 2:00-3:15pm
Jose Falconi

The problematics of digital media and visual representation in conceptualizing, documenting, and visualizing human rights and humanitarian issues.  CA 1.

This course is an invitation to analyze the role of images and the aesthetic experience in relation to our capacity to 'recognize' the humanity of others. Students will consider questions such as: In what ways do images or visual material about suffering -- especially when suffering occurs at a distance -- matter in one’s decision to contribute to a human rights or humanitarian campaign and to be effectively moved? How do we end up 'picturing' human rights? Does this picturing still have any impact, given our increasing mistrust of images? Can images really change a given political environment or unlock an otherwise intractable situation?

HRTS 3807: Constitutional Rights & Liberties
TTH 9:30-10:45am
Kimberly Bergendahl

The role of the Supreme Court in interpreting the Bill of Rights. Topics include freedoms of speech and religion, criminal due process, and equal protection. 

Capstone 

HRTS 4291: Service Learning Seminar/Internship
F 9:05-9:55am Online Synchronous
Alyssa Webb 

Combination of supervised fieldwork within the larger human rights community with regular classroom meetings for reflection/analysis on the application of human rights concepts and practices. Students must secure a satisfactory intern position before the end of the second week of the semester of enrollment in this course; students should be in consultation with the instructor several months in advance. 

HRTS 4996W: Senior Thesis
By arrangement

Research and writing of major project exploring a topic with human rights, with close supervision and production of multiple written drafts. 

Graduate

Spring 2024 Course Offerings: Master of Arts

Common Core Classes 

HRTS 5351.001: Topics in Human Rights Practice - Visual Storytelling Practices 
F 12:10-3:10pm
Catherine Masud 

The use of human rights archival materials in documentary storytelling. Students will be trained in different documentary techniques and storytelling approaches working with oral history narratives and archival materials. This is the second part of a two-semester unit addressing a common theme. Part I is not a prerequisite for Part II.

HRTS 5351.002: Topics in Human Rights Practice - ‘Media’ted Human Rights: Gender, Race and Coloniality
TTH 12:30-1:45pm
Carmel Christy Kattithara Joseph 

In the media saturated environment we live in, our perception about various issues, including those concerning human rights are shaped and negotiated through diverse media forms. This course aims to equip students with a critical lens to understand the institution of media, human rights discourse and representational practices around it.

Course Flyer

HRTS 5600: Human Rights Practice Lab
M 11:00-1:30pm
Sandra Sirota 

Critical engagement with human rights issues, strategies, tactics, institutions, and law in a practical setting. Students work collaboratively on a project addressing a pressing human rights issue and refine skills integral to working in the human rights field. Skills include information gathering, ethical analysis, effective communication across diverse audiences, and creative problem-solving.

Foundational Electives 

HRTS 5055: Theory and Practice of International Criminal Justice
Online Asynchronous
Predrag Dojcinovic 

An introduction to foundational concepts of international criminal justice such as international humanitarian and criminal law, genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression, and theories of individual criminal responsibility. An exploration of the complex challenges, successes, and failures of international criminal courts and tribunals. 

HRTS 5270: History of Human Rights
T 2:00-5:00pm
Sara Silverstein

Covers the field's classic texts, controversies, and recent topics. Incorporates political, social, intellectual, and cultural history. 

HRTS 5428: Torture
TH 1:30-4:00pm
David L. Richards

Examination of the use of torture by state and non-state actors, both historically and today. Topics may include: Why torture is perpetrated; extant domestic and international legal frameworks to remedy torture and their effectiveness; the business of torture; and the effect of torture on transitional justice. 

Course Flyer

LAW 7878: International Human Rights
W 2:00-5:00pm
Eleanor Bottini 

This course analyzes the essence of human rights in comparison with other rights of citizens. Human rights shall be considered from the viewpoint of international regulation (the United Nations Charter, Universal Declaration of Human Rights), regulation in different parts of the world and in different countries (United States of America, western European countries, Russia and eastern European countries). Concrete cases of human rights violations and concrete means of protecting human rights will be discussed. 

SWEL 5385: Human Rights and Social Work
F 9:00-1:00pm
Emily Loveland 

Theoretical, conceptual, and practical foundation for social workers to engage in a human rights-based approach to social work. Students will gain an understanding of the international human rights system, social work's contribution to achieving human rights, and how international human rights principles can be applied to social work practice. We will use a number of cases from varied countries, including the United States, to examine how social workers can both advocate for and respect human rights in their work. 

Supplementary Electives

ENGL 6540: Seminar in Literature and Human Rights - Antislavery Literature and Human Rights
Th 9:30-12:00PM
Sarah Winter

The interdisciplinary study of literature and human rights discourse.

Expanded Course Description

LAW 7653: European Human Rights
T 2:00-5:00PM
Mark Janis

An introduction to the most advanced system of international law devoted to the protection of human rights. The course explores (1) the European Court and Commission of Human Rights and contrasts the European system to other forms of international legal process, and (2) the rights protected by the European Human Rights Law, e.g., protection against torture, respect for private and family life, freedom of expression, fair trial, and contrasts them to the rights protected in the United States and Canada.

PUBH 5460: Health and Human Rights
Tu 5:30-8:30 pm
Audrey Chapman

Explores the many ways in which human health and well-being are related to human rights. Human rights is a field of international law that includes major treaties, treaty bodies, and adjudicatory mechanisms. This course will review the ways in which human rights instruments and jurisprudence have addressed health and issues related to health. Students will also study a wide range of substantive public health issues that have a human rights dimension, and consider the ways that human rights are used as advocacy tools to improve the structural environment that shapes the public's health.

SOCI/WGSS 5614: Sexual Citizenship
Tu 3:30-6:00PM
Nancy Naples

Sexuality as an axis of citizenship in diverse national and international contexts. Analysis of access to citizenship, relationship recognition, marriage rights, heteronormativity and compulsory heterosexuality, trans citizenship claims, immigration, asylum, sex work, reproductive rights, sex education, racism and racialization, colonialism, and social justice.

Spring 2024 Course Offerings: Graduate Certificate

Core Classes 

LAW 7878: International Human Rights
W 2:00-5:00pm
Eleanor Bottini  

This course analyzes the essence of human rights in comparison with other rights of citizens. Human rights shall be considered from the viewpoint of international regulation (the United Nations Charter, Universal Declaration of Human Rights), regulation in different parts of the world and in different countries (United States of America, western European countries, Russia and eastern European countries). Concrete cases of human rights violations and concrete means of protecting human rights will be discussed. 

SWEL 5385: Human Rights and Social Work
F 9:00-1:00pm
Emily Loveland

Theoretical, conceptual, and practical foundation for social workers to engage in a human rights-based approach to social work. Students will gain an understanding of the international human rights system, social work's contribution to achieving human rights, and how international human rights principles can be applied to social work practice. We will use a number of cases from varied countries, including the United States, to examine how social workers can both advocate for and respect human rights in their work.

Electives 

ENGL 6540: Seminar in Literature and Human Rights - Antislavery Literature and Human Rights
Th 9:30-12:00PM
Sarah Winter

The interdisciplinary study of literature and human rights discourse.

Expanded Course Description

HRTS 5055: Theory and Practice of International Criminal Justice

Online Asynchronous
Predrag Dojcinovic 

An introduction to foundational concepts of international criminal justice such as international humanitarian and criminal law, genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes and aggression, and theories of individual criminal responsibility. An exploration of the complex challenges, successes, and failures of international criminal courts and tribunals. 

HRTS 5270: History of Human Rights
T 2:00-5:00pm
Sara Silverstein 

Covers the field's classic texts, controversies, and recent topics. Incorporates political, social, intellectual, and cultural history. 

HRTS 5351.001: Topics in Human Rights Practice - Visual Storytelling Practices
F 12:10-3:10pm
Catherine Masud 

The use of human rights archival materials in documentary storytelling. Students will be trained in different documentary techniques and storytelling approaches working with oral history narratives and archival materials. This is the second part of a two-semester unit addressing a common theme. Part I is not a prerequisite for Part II. 

HRTS 5351.002: Topics in Human Rights Practice - ‘Media’ted Human Rights: Gender, Race and Coloniality
TTH 12:30-1:45pm
Carmel Christy Kattithara Joseph 

In the media saturated environment we live in, our perception about various issues, including those concerning human rights are shaped and negotiated through diverse media forms. This introductory course aims to equip students with a critical lens to understand the institution of media, human rights discourse and representational practices around it.

Course Flyer

HRTS 5428: Torture
TH 1:30-4:00pm
David L. Richards

Examination of the use of torture by state and non-state actors, both historically and today. Topics may include: Why torture is perpetrated; extant domestic and international legal frameworks to remedy torture and their effectiveness; the business of torture; and the effect of torture on transitional justice. 

Course Flyer

HRTS 5600: Human Rights Practice Lab
M 11:00-1:30pm
Sandra Sirota 

Critical engagement with human rights issues, strategies, tactics, institutions, and law in a practical setting. Students work collaboratively on a project addressing a pressing human rights issue and refine skills integral to working in the human rights field. Skills include information gathering, ethical analysis, effective communication across diverse audiences, and creative problem-solving. 

LAW 7653: European Human Rights
T 2:00-5:00PM
Mark Janis

An introduction to the most advanced system of international law devoted to the protection of human rights. The course explores (1) the European Court and Commission of Human Rights and contrasts the European system to other forms of international legal process, and (2) the rights protected by the European Human Rights Law, e.g., protection against torture, respect for private and family life, freedom of expression, fair trial, and contrasts them to the rights protected in the United States and Canada.

LAW 7655: Employment Discrimination Law
Mo Th 5:00-6:30PM
Jon Bauer

This course focuses on a rapidly growing aspect of labor and employment law. The course introduces the concept of discrimination by examining Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, The Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Section 1981 of the Civil War Reconstruction Statutes. After exploring the process of proving and defending against individual and systematic discrimination claims, the course considers special problems in discrimination law that may include pregnancy, sexual harassment, sexual preference, religious discrimination and retaliation. The course also examines the alternative approach to discrimination adopted in the Americans with Disabilities Act. Fundamentals of statutory construction, litigation strategy, and statistical methods of proof are emphasized. Numerous unresolved issues are addressed throughout the course. Procedures and remedies may also be considered.

LAW 7759: The Nuremberg Trials
M 6:30-8:30PM
Robert Birmingham

This seminar is a study of war crime trials held in the aftermath of World War II, in their legal and social contexts: from the law of the late Weimer Republic (c. 1928-1933) and the Third Reich (1933-1945); through the Nuremberg Trials (1945-1949) and that of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1961; to related domestic litigation under the Alien Tort Claims Act and otherwise.

LAW 7872: Comparative Law and Rights
W 4:00-6:30pm
Angel Oquendo

From a human-rights and international-litigation perspective, the course will deal with constitutional law as well as specific areas of private law such as civil law, civil procedure, and business law. It will first introduce the civil-law tradition, along with the legal history of Continental Europe and Latin America. With a focus on the latter region but constant references to the former, the discussion will then shift to constitutional law: to the notion of constitutionalism, basic principles, the vindication of rights, and second- and third-generation entitlements. Thereafter, it will likewise zero in on civil law in particular, civil codes, interpretation, codified sexism, and civil remedies as well as on civil procedure specifically, the conception of procedure, procedural guaranties, and collective actions. The class will close with an analogous exploration of corporate law. Throughout, it will contrast legal institutions from the United States.

PUBH 5460: Health and Human Rights
Tu 5:30-8:30 pm
Audrey Chapman

Explores the many ways in which human health and well-being are related to human rights. Human rights is a field of international law that includes major treaties, treaty bodies, and adjudicatory mechanisms. This course will review the ways in which human rights instruments and jurisprudence have addressed health and issues related to health. Students will also study a wide range of substantive public health issues that have a human rights dimension, and consider the ways that human rights are used as advocacy tools to improve the structural environment that shapes the public's health.

SWEL 5318: Core Concepts of Child and Adolescent Trauma
Sa 9:00am-12:00pm Hybrid
Patricia Wilcox

Incorporates the new National Child Traumatic Stress Network core curriculum on child trauma (CCCT). The course conveys the crucial evidence-based concepts, components, and skills designed by the NCTSN to strengthen competency in assessment, referral, and treatment. 

SOCI/WGSS 5614: Sexual Citizenship
Tu 3:30-6:00PM
Nancy Naples

Sexuality as an axis of citizenship in diverse national and international contexts. Analysis of access to citizenship, relationship recognition, marriage rights, heteronormativity and compulsory heterosexuality, trans citizenship claims, immigration, asylum, sex work, reproductive rights, sex education, racism and racialization, colonialism, and social justice.