Research Program on Arts & Human Rights

The Research Program on Arts & Human Rights explores how the arts can promote the full exercise of human rights and the consolidation of a democratic culture. The arts not only make human rights visible. They also advance democratic thinking as they help us imagine new futures and open unique spaces for dialogue and debate, ushering us into novel modes of experience that provide concrete grounds for rethinking our relationship with one another. Thus, the arts can act as a powerful means of sustaining individual and collective reflection on human rights, and of linking individual and collective public experience, social belonging, and citizenship.

Guiding Concepts

Art makes visible human rights, and their violation, helping us combat injustice.
Art strengthens mutual recognition, opening new spaces for dialogue and debate.
Art forges new potential futures, helping us envision a more moral and just society.

Santiago Escobar-Jaramillo, Tierra de Luz

Santiago Escobar-Jaramillo, Tierra de Luz

Themes & Projects

Spatial Memory
Memorials, memorialization; museums and sites of conscience; spaces of human rights

Symbolic Reparations and Transitional Justice

Arts and Democracy
Fostering democratic imagination through the visual and performing arts

Visual Culture and Human Rights
Traditional and new visual practices and technologies in relation to human rights

Events

“Transitional Justice & Memorialization: Architecture, Memory, Truth” – April 2021

“Theatre and Human Rights: The Politics of Dramatic Form” – April 2022

Arts & Human Rights News

Scott Wallace, associate professor of journalism, discusses his experiences as a war reporter in advance of a panel discussion at 4 p.m. at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center.

Memorials commemorating a nation’s past conflicts can help build a more peaceful future, say two UConn researchers.

Dramatic arts professor Gary English is spending a year working with the Freedom Theatre in a Palestinian refugee camp.

Our People

Leadership

Jose Falconi

José Luis Falconi

Co-Chair, Research Program on Arts & Human Rights
Assistant Professor, Art History & Human Rights

jose.falconi@uconn.edu

Robin Greeley

Robin Greeley

Co-Chair, Research Program on Arts & Human Rights
Professor, Art History

robin.greeley@uconn.edu

Michael Orwicz

Co-Chair, Research Program on Arts & Human Rights
Associate Professor, Art History

michael.orwicz@uconn.edu

People

Alexis Boylan

Professor of Art History and Africana Studies Institute
Director of Academic Affairs, Humanities Institute

alexis.boylan@uconn.edu

Stephen Dyson

Professor, Political Science

stephen.dyson@uconn.edu

Gary English

Professor, Dramatic Arts

gary.english@uconn.edu

Jose Falconi

Co-Chair, Research Program on Arts & Human Rights
Assistant Professor, Art and Art History & Human Rights Institute

jose.falconi@uconn.edu

Robin Greeley

Co-Chair, Research Program on Arts & Human Rights
Associate Professor, Art History

robin.greeley@uconn.edu

Emily Larned

Assistant Professor, Graphic Design

emily.larned@uconn.edu

kathy libal

Kathryn Libal

Director, Human Rights Institute
Associate Professor, Social Work & Human Rights

kathryn.libal@uconn.edu

Jacqueline Loss

Professor & Director of Graduate Studies, Department of Literatures, Cultures, & Languages

jacqueline.loss@uconn.edu

Asif Majid

Asif Majid

Assistant Professor, Dramatic Arts & Human Rights

asif.majid@uconn.edu

Catherine Masud

Assistant Professor In-Residence, Human Rights Documentary Filmmaking

catherine.masud@uconn.edu

Michael Orwicz

Co-Chair, Research Program on Arts & Human Rights
Associate Professor, Art History

michael.orwicz@uconn.edu

Macushla Robinson

Director, Contemporary Art Galleries
Assistant Professor in Residence, Department of Art & Art History

macushla.robinson@uconn.edu

Christine Sylvester

Professor, Political Science

christine.sylvester@uconn.edu

Scott Wallace

Scott Wallace

Associate Professor, Journalism

scott.wallace@uconn.edu