Summer Internship Fellows

Current Placements

The Human Rights Institute has developed relationships with the following internship placements.  Each of these organizations have agreed to accept a UConn Human Rights student each summer as an intern.

Amnesty International USA

amnesty

Amnesty International is a global movement of people fighting injustice and promoting human rights. They are currently the world’s largest grassroots human rights organization, we investigate and expose abuses, educate and mobilize the public, and help transform societies to create a safer, more just world.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a remote internship at Amnesty International USA in Boston Massachusetts.

This eight-week learning immersion experience with the Membership Advocacy & Organizing Department in the Northeast Regional Office of Amnesty International USA. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Open only to Human Rights Majors.

This position requires an individual to be hands on and roll up your sleeves, ability to work independently with flexibility and attention to detail.

Visit http://www.amnestyusa.org/for more information.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

Business and Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC)

BHRRC Logo

The Business and Human Rights Resource Centre works with everyone to advance human rights in business and eradicate abuse. They work to build corporate transparency, strengthen corporate accountability and empower advocates.

Internship Eligibility and Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a remote internship at Business and Human Rights Resource Centre in New York, NY.

The Business and Human Rights Resource Centre Internship is an eight-week learning immersion experience with an international non-profit human rights organization dedicated to advancing human rights in business. Students with an interest in advancing human rights in business should consider this internship. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Open to all Human Rights Major and Minor undergraduates at UConn.

Visit the Business and Human Rights Resource Center Website for more information.

This internship is sponsored by the Dodd Center.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read about our interns' experiences working at the Business and Human Rights Resource Center, please click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL)

CEJILThe Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) is an international non-profit human rights organization dedicated ensuring the full enjoyment of human rights by all individuals in the Americas through the effective use of the tools of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and international human rights law. The CEJIL employs a unique intervention strategy that is broad and creative, focused on the protection and promotion of human rights in the Americas. They work to respond to human rights violations, aim to reduce inequalities, strengthen democracy and rule of law, and increase the effectiveness of the decisions adopted by the Inter-American System through equal access to the system’s mechanisms.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a remote internship at The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL).

Students with an interest in Latin America, international law and human rights should consider this internship. Proficiency in Spanish and/or Portuguese is also highly preferred. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Open to all Human Rights Major and Minor undergraduates at UConn.

This internship is sponsored by the Dodd Center.

Visit The Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) for more information.

If applying, please indicate which of the following projects/areas you would be most interested in working with:

Americas Network on Nationality and Statelessness.pdf
GQUAL: A Campaign for Gender Parity in International Representation.pdf
CEJIL Communications Internship.pdf

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read about our interns' experiences working at CEJIL, please click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

The Education Project

The Education Project LogoThe Education Project is an entirely volunteer-run organization providing a platform that connects professionals and college students with students in grades K-12. Through different online mediums (e.g. Zoom, WebEx, Google Meets, etc.), students receive a one-on-one education coupled with an irreplaceable mentorship experience. The Education Project was founded in March 2020 amidst the pandemic with the mission to provide high-quality, remote tutoring and mentorship to K-12 students in need across the nation, completely free of cost. The volunteer tutors are primarily college students, but also include recent grads, teachers, and other professionals.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a remote internship with The Education Project.

The Education Project is a twelve-week learning immersion experience with a volunteer run, non-profit human rights organization dedicated to advancing human rights in education. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Open to all Human Rights Major and Minor undergraduates at UConn.

Visit The Education Project website for more information.

More information about internship opportunities at The Education Project can be found here.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

OutRight Action International

OutRight seeks to advance human rights and opportunities for LGBTIQ people around the world by developing critical partnerships at global, regional, and national levels to build capacity, document violations, advocate for inclusion and equality, and hold leaders accountable for protecting the rights of all LGBTIQ people. Today, we partner with local LGBTIQ organizations across four regions and maintain a cross-regional LGBTIQ initiative at the UN in New York. As an international LGBTIQ organization with a long history of productive and trusting relationships with grassroots LGBTIQ communities worldwide, we serve as a bridge between local communities and high-impact external levers of power.

 

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate major to complete a summer internship at OutRight Action International in New York, NY.

This eight-week learning immersion experience is with the Communications Team in the New York office of OutRight.  A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Open to all Human Rights Major and Minor undergraduates at UConn.

More about the internship:

Communications interns will gain hands-on experience in non-profit communications work, including media relations, message development, publication and media outlet monitoring, media production, editing and translation. Responsibilities will vary according to departmental needs but may include: monitoring news outlets; editing web communications, and reports; maintaining the press contact database; writing articles; contacting journalists about potential stories; research for digital media strategy and target audiences; social media-related activities; or planning events.

Skills Acquired:

  • Experience as a digital journalist for school or other newspaper to produce 300 to 400 word blog on OutRight issues with subject guidance,
  • help with digital media distribution for online marketing and social media,
  • ability to synthesize material to help produce weekly news roundup / copy editing skills
  • research, as needed for opeds, info graphics, press releases
  • interest in/familiarity with global media to create lists for media work.
  • interest in graphic/web design and media making a plus

More information about OutRight Action International can be found here.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read about our interns' experiences working at OutRight Action International, please click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

The Scholars at Risk Network

Scholars at Risk is an international network of institutions and individuals whose mission it is to protect scholars and promote academic freedom. Scholars at Risk also provides advisory services for scholars and hosts, campaigns for scholars who are imprisoned or silenced in their home countries, monitoring of attacks on higher education communities worldwide, and leadership in deploying new tools and strategies for promoting academic freedom and improving respect for university values everywhere.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a remote internship with the Scholars at Risk Network

This eight-week learning immersion experience with the Scholars at Risk Advocacy Team. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Open only to Human Rights Majors.

Scholars at Risk (SAR) seeks a dedicated, detail-oriented intern with excellent writing and research skills.

Visit the Scholars at Risk website for more information about the organization and its mission.

More information about this placement can be found here.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

Social Accountability InternationalSAI_logo_header

The Social Accountability International Summer Internship is an eight-week learning immersion experience with an international non-profit human rights organization dedicated to the ethical treatment of workers around the world.

 

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a summer internship at Social Accountability International (SAI) in New York, NY.

The Social Accountability International Summer Internship is an eight-week remote learning experience with an international non-profit human rights organization dedicated to the ethical treatment of workers around the world. Students interested in legal research, management procedures, and the elimination of sweatshops worldwide will work with SAI programming on crucial issues related to labor rights. Visit SAI for more information.

A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Students interested in how businesses develop standards for respecting labor rights and addressing overall workplace issues should consider this internship. Open to all Human Rights Majors and Minors at UConn.

This internship is sponsored by the Northeast Utilities Chair in Business Ethics.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read about our interns' experiences working at Social Accountability International, please click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

witness_logo

WITNESS

WITNESS is a media centric advocacy institution that has been in existence since 1992. Students involved in this internship will observe first-hand the practice of utilizing media to promote human rights advocacy. The internship with WITNESS is in Social Media Outreach and will help WITNESS promote their initiatives/campaigns and engage with their social media following.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a summer internship at Witness in New York, NY.

This eight-week learning immersion experience is awarded to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student completing a summer internship at WITNESS in New York, NY. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Open to all Human Rights Major and Minor undergraduates at UConn.

Students interested in using video and storytelling in advocating for human rights around the world should consider this internship.

More information about the Summer 2015 internship at WITNESS can be found here.

To read about our interns' experiences working at WITNESS, please click here.

For more information about the application process, click here.

Individualized Internship Placement

This year the Human Rights Institute is extending one fellowship offer for a student pursuing an individualized internship placement. This option would allow students who are interested in interning with a specific organization that is not a current HRI placement partner to be considered for a fellowship.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

The Human Rights Institute is committed to supporting students as they find exciting ways to integrate their human rights education into new experiential learning opportunities. To demonstrate our commitment to our students ingenuity, we extend one annual fellowship offer to a student pursuing an individualized internship placement.

Open only to Human Rights Majors. There are additional application requirements for students who would like to pursue this option, please make an appointment with Rachel Jackson for further information.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

In recent years students have also been placed at the following organizations:

Croatian Mediation Association and Mediation Center

Croatian Mediation Association and Mediation Center

CMC
Croatia is a small and beautiful country with a vibrant community, including fully dedicated and experienced mediators (judges, lawyers, non-lawyers from many professions) working together and building new democratic institutions to better communicate and peacefully solve differences and manage conflicts and disputes. The internship host, the Croatian Mediation Association and its Mediation Center was founded as part of an alternative dispute resolution (ADR) initiative of the Croatian Mediation Association and domestic commercial courts and business organizations to enhance access to justice through ADR. Students involved in this internship will observe first-hand the practice of alternative dispute resolution in an emerging democracy through daily involvement with the activities of the Center.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

Two internships will be awarded to full-time students at the University of Connecticut. Undergraduates and Law students are encouraged to apply. Students will live in the capital city of Zagreb for the 4 week summer internship in May/June. Roundtrip air travel, local lodging and living expenses will be covered during the internship period for students selected.

Students with an interest human rights, Southeastern Europe and/or alternative dispute resolution in the legal system should consider this internship.

This is a fully funded summer internship, coordinated by the University of Connecticut’s Human Rights Institute and supported by the Victor Schachter ’64 Rule of Law Award.

For more information about this program, please contact Rachel Jackson at rachel.jackson@uconn.edu.

To learn more about the Croatian Mediation Association and Mediation Center, please visit http://www.mirenje.hr/

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read about our interns' experiences working at the Croatian Mediation Association, please click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.


Victor Schachter, Founder of the HRI Rule of Law Award

Vic Schacter

Mr. Schachter is a partner of Fenwick & West LLP in California, where he practices labor and employment law and related litigation before federal and state courts. He is also an accomplished advocate and mediator in alternative dispute resolution matters. Mr. Schachter graduated UCONN in 1964 (Phi Beta Kappa), and New York University School of Law (1967). He has written and spoken extensively on a broad array of employment topics, and has appeared on many national radio and television programs. He has been selected for “The Best Lawyers in America” for over 20 years, repeatedly recognized as a “Northern California Super Lawyer,” and listed in California and International Who’s Who USA. Mr. Schachter has promoted alternate dispute resolution and judicial case management in Brazil, Turkey, Malaysia and India, and he was honored as a California Lawyer Attorney of the Year for his global pro bono work. Mr. Schachter is the Founder and President of the Foundation for Sustainable Rule of Law Initiatives, through which he continues international legal reform initiatives.

Net Impact

Net Impact

net-impact-logoNet Impact empowers a new generation to drive social and environmental change on campus and throughout their careers. They provide the network and resources to inspire emerging leaders to build successful “impact careers” — either by working in jobs dedicated to change or by bringing a social and environmental lens to traditional business roles.

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

This eight-week learning immersion experience is awarded to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student completing a summer internship at Net Impact in San Francisco, CA. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship.

As a Net Impact fellow, interns will get hands-on experience and access to a dedicated network of professionals, which will help you, develop critical business and communication skills you won’t learn in school, launch a career in socially responsible/sustainable business, nonprofit management, or social entrepreneurship, build a network of contacts and colleagues in a range of sectors and industries. Open to all undergraduates at UConn, with preference given to Human Rights Majors and Minors.

This internship is sponsored by the Eversource Energy Chair in Business Ethics.

Students interesting in creating positive social and environmental change in the workplace and the world should consider this internship.

For more information about the application process, click here.

To read more about our internship fellow cohorts throughout the years, click here.

More information about the Summer Fellowship Program at NetImpact can be found here..pdf

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY)

"The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was a United Nations court of law that dealt with war crimes that took place during the conflicts in the Balkans in the 1990s. During its mandate, which lasted from 1993 - 2017, it irreversibly changed the landscape of international humanitarian law, provided victims an opportunity to voice the horrors they witnessed and experienced, and proved that those suspected of bearing the greatest responsibility for atrocities committed during armed conflicts can be called to account." - https://www.icty.org/ 

Internship Eligibility & Award Information

The University of Connecticut Human Rights Institute announces a competition for graduating University of Connecticut seniors with a Human Rights Minor or Major for the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). This six-month internship at the ICTY in The Hague, Netherlands, will provide supervised working experience in the Research Unit of the Office of the Prosecutor. The internship comes with a $6,000 scholarship to put towards accommodation and travel expenses.

Interns are assigned to perform contextual research and analysis review various facets of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, including historical background, political structures, demographic changes and use of media. Applicants with a university degree in a relevant field (e.g. political science, history, media studies) are preferred.

 

goldstone

Internship at the ICTY: The Hague, Netherlands

The University of Connecticut Human Rights Institute announces a competition for graduating University of Connecticut seniors with a Human Rights Minor or Major for the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). This six-month internship at the ICTY in The Hague, Netherlands, will provide supervised working experience in the Research Unit of the Office of the Prosecutor. The internship comes with a $6,000 scholarship to put towards accommodation and travel expenses.

Interns are assigned to perform contextual research and analysis review various facets of the conflicts in the former Yugoslavia, including historical background, political structures, demographic changes and use of media. Applicants with a university degree in a relevant field (e.g. political science, history, media studies) are preferred.

Applicants must submit an HRI Internship Application.

Application deadline: February 3
For more information about the application process, click here.


Richard J. Goldstone Biography

Richard J. Goldstone, 1959 B.A., 1962 LL.B. (Wits), practiced as an Advocate at the Johannesburg Bar. In 1980, he was made Judge of the Transvaal Supreme Court. In 1989, he was appointed Judge of the Appellate Division of the Supreme Court. From July 1994 to October 2003, he was a Justice of the Constitutional Court of South Africa. In the spring of 2005, he was the Henry Shattuck Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School.

From 15 August 1994 to September 1996, he served as the Chief Prosecutor of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda. From August 1999 until December 2001, he was the chairperson of the International Independent Inquiry on Kosovo that was established by Swedish Prime Minister Goran Persson. In December 2001, he was appointed as the co-chairperson of the International Task Force on Terrorism that was established by the International Bar Association. He is presently the co-chairperson of the Human Rights Institute of the International Bar Association. From 1999 to 2003, he served as a member of the International Group of Advisers of the International Committee of the Red Cross. He is presently a member of the committee, chaired by Paul A. Volcker, appointed by the Secretary-General of the United Nations to investigate allegations regarding the Iraq Oil for Food Program.

Goldstone is the author of numerous articles on international humanitarian law. He has written forewords to several books, including "Martha Minow’s Beyond Vengeance and Forgiveness: Facing History after Genocide" and "Mass Violence and War Crimes: The Legacy of Nuremberg", which examines the political and legal influence the Nuremberg trials have had over contemporary war crime proceedings. More recently, he has written about the challenge to individual human rights posed by counter-terror measures in R. A. Wilson, ed., "Human Rights in the 'War on Terror'".

Goldstone Fellowship Awardees

Goldstone Bio photoCelia Guillard is the 2015 recipient of the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Celia triple majored in Political Science, with Individualized Majors in both Neuroscience and International Relations, as well as minoring in Human Rights. Four-time New England Scholar and member of both Phi Beta Kappa and Phi Kappa Phi National Honors Societies, Celia was an Honors student and completed two Honors theses while at UConn. She previously interned in New York City at the labor rights organization, Social Accountability International, where she worked as a research assistant on a number of projects, including the development of a possible certification standard to improve workers’ rights within corporate supply chains. She also served as one of three undergraduate representatives on the UConn President’s Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility and was a UNESCO Student Ambassador, organizing and leading an awareness campaign campus-wide on the topic of ethically produced chocolate, and highlighting the human rights abuses commonly found on conventionally produced chocolate plantations. Celia was also a participant in UConn’s prestigious Leadership Legacy Experience, as well as having been selected to represent UConn at four international human rights conferences.

She was an active research assistant throughout her undergraduate career and conducted extensive legal research with Dr. David Richards over the past four years including coding for his CIRI Human Rights Data Project, contributing to research used in his book “Violence Against Women and the Law,” working as a SHARE and Bennett Research Assistant, and acting as a teaching assistant for his course, “Evaluating Human Rights Practices of Countries.” Celia’s first Honors thesis focused on cross-national patterns examining marital rape legislation worldwide and factors that may contribute to the strength or weakness of existing laws. She was also an undergraduate research assistant in both a Behavioral Neuroscience laboratory and a Clinical Neuroscience laboratory on campus, where she assisted in conducting pre-clinical drug trials in rodent models of depression and schizophrenia, as well as screening of human participants for schizophrenia studies. Celia is deeply interested in the linkage between the law, human rights, and psychology - specifically the ways in which human rights abuses and trauma affect victims, perpetrators, and their communities, as well as subsequent reconciliation and rehabilitation processes. She plans to pursue a graduate degree and career in this field.

Jonathan Sykes, an undergraduate student pursuing a double majoring in Human Rights and Political Science.
FreedmanMeika Freeman is the 2013 recipient of the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.  She worked as a Military Analysis Intern in the Office of the Prosecutor from August 2013 to January 2014. Meika graduated from UConn in May 2013 as a History and Human Rights major.  While at UConn, she was a part of the Honors Program as well as a member of the Alpha Lambda Delta and Phi Kappa Phi National Honors Societies.  She also served as a Student Ambassador for Human Rights in UNESCO where she was a part of the Peer Education Project that worked to educate UConn students about human rights and raise awareness of contemporary human rights issues on campus. Meika has previously completed two internships related to both human rights and law.  In 2012, she was a part of the UConn Honors in Cape Town Study Abroad Program and interned at the Black Sash in Cape Town, South Africa.  The Black Sash is a non-governmental organization advocating for human rights for all South Africans, with a particular focus on economic and social rights.  She helped monitor a local refugee center and aided individuals in the legal process of applying for refugee status.  She also helped create and lead workshops on community involvement in local government as a means of addressing human rights issues, such as insufficient access to health services. In her senior year, Meika interned at Connecticut Legal Services in Willimantic, CT.  Connecticut Legal Services is a non-profit law firm dedicated to helping individuals from low-income backgrounds.  While there, she interned in the Children At-Risk Unit and assisted the Senior Staff Attorney in representing families at client meetings and the Superior Court for Juvenile Matters.After completing this internship, Meika plans to attend law school and study international and human rights law.
Casaly2012 recipient of the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

After graduating from the University of Connecticut in May 2012, Paige Casaly began a six month internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in The Hague, Netherlands. She was awarded the Goldstone Fellowship from the UConn Human Rights Institute, which provides funds for her trip to the ICTY.Paige majored in Anthropology and minored in Human Rights through the UConn Honors program. She served as vice president and secretary for the UConn chapter of the Lambda Alpha National Honors Society for Anthropology and was a member of the Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society. While at UConn, she completed volunteer archaeobotanical research within the Anthropology department and completed an Honors thesis analyzing Early Bronze Age archaeobotanical remains from Tell Qarqur, Syria. She received the CLAS Fleur & Jerry Lawrence Endowed Scholarship in International Relations and Human Rights for the 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 school years.

In the spring semester of 2011, Paige studied abroad in London, UK, with the UConn in London study abroad program. Here she participated in an internship with London Citizens, a community-based non-governmental organization that works to solve problems and improve the neighborhoods of London through organizing and uniting pre-existing community groups to work towards common goals. Her internship was focused on the Living Wage Project, which pressured companies to guarantee wages high enough for all Londoners to support their families and live dignified lives.

After completing her internship with the ICTY, Paige plans to study international and human rights law at the New York University School of Law.

Update: Spring 2012 - Paige Casaly

The Goldstone Fellowship here at the Human Rights Institute has been providing UConn graduating students taking the Human Rights minor, or major, with a unique opportunity to intern at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). This six-month internship at the ICTY in The Hague, Netherlands, will provide supervised working experience in the Research Unit of the Office of the Prosecutor. Here Paige Casaly discusses some of her recent experiences of being a Goldstone Fellow with the HRI staff. She said that she “really cannot thank the Goldstone Fellowship and the Human Rights Institute at UConn enough for sending me off on this incredible adventure in The Hague. This opportunity has honestly been a life-changing experience for me and I cannot truly express all of my thanks.”

After graduating from UConn, Paige’s plan was to attend law school the following year, take the bar exam and go on to practice law in the United States. However, her plans were put on hold when the UConn Human Rights Institute gave her “a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity: the chance to complete a six-month internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) through the Goldstone Fellowship. I jumped at this chance, and almost three months in I still can't believe my incredible luck.”

Paige served as a Military Analysis Team intern in the Office of the Prosecutor, or OTP, working on the Ratko Mladic case. Throughout the first half of her internship, Paige said that she “already gained so much invaluable experience that I never would have gotten in a classroom experience. Every day I am able to work firsthand with documents and evidence from the Mladic case, and I was present in the public gallery when the first witness testimony in the Mladic trial began. I was also present in the courtroom with the Mladic OTP trial team for the testimony of one witness in the Mladic case during both closed and open session. This was particularly interesting as it gave me insight into witness protection measures that are put into place at the ICTY and the unique risks that are undertaken by a witness testifying in an international criminal case. I have also been able to watch proceedings of the International Criminal Court, which is also located in The Hague, and pick up on some interesting differences between the ICC and the ICTY.”

Paige also said that she was really lucky to have had the chance to meet many extraordinary people, from her fellow interns to the prosecutor himself. She learned a lot from all of them, especially through the OTP Intern Lecture Series. This was a weekly lecture series put on especially for interns by OTP staff members, covering everything from the history of the conflict in the former Yugoslavia to modes of liability under the ICTY statute to the history and legacy of the ICTY. Through these lectures and firsthand experience she said she learned so much about the precedents set by the ICTY in the fields of transitional justice and international criminal law, along with the issues that accompany this territory. This experience helped her gain insight into how different domestic legal systems and national jurisprudence have been integrated into the statute of this ad hoc body to supply its jurisdiction for the prosecution of war criminals. Perhaps most importantly, Paige said that she “gained firsthand knowledge of practical procedure in international law which will help me in my future legal career.”

Of course, the last few months have not been all work and no play! Paige got to explore the beautiful, historical beachside city of The Hague, and met many extremely friendly Dutch and ex-patriot residents. She also got to know many other ICTY interns, as well as interns from other international organizations in the city. In fact, every Thursday night a different restaurant or bar in The Hague hosts a gathering of interns from the ICTY, the ICC, the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, and other organizations. The Goldstone Fellowship has also given Paige the opportunity to travel around the Netherlands and further into Europe, enabling her to see places like Anne Frank's House in Amsterdam and Neuschwanstein Castle in Germany.

Overall, Paige describes her “time as an ICTY intern has truly been an extension of my UConn education, and has prepared me for law school and life after graduation in more ways than I could have ever imagined. The last three months have been exceedingly busy and very challenging, but they have left me with some great friends and wonderful experiences. I cannot believe that it is already half over, but I thank my lucky stars (and the UConn Human Rights Institute, of course!) that I have still have three more incredible months left in The Hague.”

“Thanks again, Dr. Wilson and Dr. Mitoma! I really am truly grateful that you chose me and gave me this opportunity; it has been incredible.”

bradburyKatherine was the 2011 recipient of the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

Katherine Bradbury is a May 2011 graduate of the University of Connecticut who will be interning at the ICTY for six months. She will be in The Hague from July through January 2012. She received the Goldstone Fellowship which provides funding for her to make the trip to the ICTY possible. While interning for the Office of the Prosecutor at the ICTY, she had a blog which can be viewed here: http://livingindenhaag.blogspot.com.While at UConn, Katherine majored in English and Political Science and minored in Human Rights. She was an active member of the National Honor Fraternity Phi Sigma Pi as well as a site manager for Big Brothers Big Sisters, a volunteer for the Husky Ambassador Program, and a Study Abroad Student Ambassador. She was also a member of Phi Beta Kappa.

As far as previous human rights experience, Katherine has had two internships during her college career in this field. Katherine studied abroad in Cape Town, South Africa her junior spring semester on the Honors in Cape Town Study Abroad Program run by UConn. While there, she took courses related to human rights topics as well as interned at a human rights non-governmental organization called Black Sash. Black Sash works toward providing and recognizing all South Africans ability to claim their rights, regardless of their socio-economic status. Katherine was a social security intern and worked on a monitoring report that was sent to the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) to help the agency better serve the communities it works with.

Katherine spent the summer before her senior year in Washington, DC taking a course at Georgetown University and interning at a HIV/AIDS organization known as Metro TeenAIDS. This non-profit group works toward helping the poorer urban youth become more aware of the dangers of STIs and the importance of proper health precautions. Katherine was involved with contributing to community outreach and presentations around southeastern DC.

After returning from The Hague, Katherine hopes to attend law school. She plans to study human rights law.

RashidZohaib Rasheed is the 2008 recipient of the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.
Rasheed was born in Kuwait on September 2nd, 1984. At the age of five, he and his family  had to evacuate Kuwait because of the Gulf War. Since then, he moved eight times and lived in Pakistan, Bahrain and until his family finally moved to the United States when Rasheed was thirteen years of age.

When Rasheed first moved to the United States, he was not a proficient English speaker and had a rough transition during middle and high school. However, he found his academic passions at the University of Connecticut, where he have studied Philosophy, Political Science and Human Rights. Through hard work and dedication at the University of Connecticut, Rasheed was awarded the highest academic honor bestowed upon undergraduates as a University Scholar. While at the University of Connecticut, he held the office of treasurer for the Muslim Student Association, and was a member of The Golden Key and National Society for Collegiate Scholars Honors Societies. Moreover, as a Community Assistant, he was an active member of the University of Connecticut student residential life.Besides pursuing his academic goals, Zohaib has been a highly engaged citizen. He has interned at the Hartford Superior Court, working in the Public Defenders Office. Rasheed also worked for a human rights NGO in Pakistan called the Young Social Reformers, where he helped organize a carnival to benefit dialysis patients. Moreover, he has been a Sergeant in the Connecticut Army National Guard since his freshman year of college and participated in relief missions for Hurricane Katrina and provided support in Operation Iraqi Freedom, earning five medals during my tenure.

He was awarded the Richard Goldstone Fellowship in February of 2008,  and worked at the International Criminal Tribunal for The Former Yugoslavia at The Hague. Rasheed's future goals are to attend an eminent law school and earn a J.D. in International Law to eventually represent the United States as an ambassador to the United Nations.

friedlander008University of Connecticut Advance 2007 Issue
"Julie Friedlander, a senior majoring in political science with a minor in human rights, is the first recipient of the Richard Goldstone Internship at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia.

Friedlander, who will graduate in May, will spend six months in The Hague, Netherlands, working in the research unit of the Office of the Prosecutor.The internship comes with $5,000 funding toward accommodation and travel.

Richard Goldstone, a former justice of the Supreme Court of South Africa, has endowed two six-month internships, beginning this year.

Goldstone is a member of the Board of Overseers of UConn’s Human Rights Institute.

“I’m extremely excited for the opportunity to do this internship,” Friedlander says.

“I plan a career in human rights and international law, and the internship will help me narrow down exactly what I want to pursue.”

Richard Wilson, Gladstein Distinguished Chair in Human Rights and director of the Human Rights Institute, says Friedlander “is one of the many talented students pursuing a human rights minor at the University. I am delighted that she will be representing UConn at the International Criminal Tribunal. It’s an exciting illustration of what students can do in an international justice setting with a minor in human rights.”

Friedlander says her experience and commitment to justice began when she became involved in starting an Amnesty International chapter at her high school in Fairfield. She has continued to investigate human rights issues as sitting president of the UConn student chapter of Amnesty International.

Throughout her undergraduate experience, Friedlander has served as a Student Ambassador for Human Rights with the UNESCO Chair of Comparative Human Rights.

“Being an ambassador has been essential to my development in human rights education,” she says.

“The in-depth study and analysis of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights has been particularly critical to furthering my comprehension of human rights.”

Friedlander has developed and implemented lesson plans on human rights in elementary, middle, and high schools.

She has also taught in First Year Experience human rights classes at UConn on topics including international law, women and the United Nations, and human rights violations in Myanmar (formerly Burma).

She served as a liaison between the UNESCO Chair of Comparative Human Rights and Lawyers without Borders, a globally-oriented volunteer group, assisting in the planning of an intergenerational conference on human rights, and spent the summer of 2006 honing her skills at the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom’s United Nations office.

Friedlander, who has taken classes including International Organizations and Law, History of Human Rights, and Comparative Perspectives on Human Rights, says she has been inspired by her courses and experience as a human rights minor.

“My classes broadened my awareness of international human rights issues,” she says.

As a complement to her studies, she assisted in research on Russian war crimes in Chechnya.

That work involved reading human rights reports from groups such as Human Rights Watch and recording abuses.

“My participation in that research helped me see the importance of investigating human rights abuses, particularly concerning violations of international law, and the need for justice to prosecute those responsible,” she says.

“The importance of international law and upholding these principles resonate strongly with my personal dedication and passion to promoting human rights,” Friedlander adds.

“I believe this internship will facilitate my growth as a human rights advocate.”"

Women’s Refugee Commission

The Women’s Refugee Commission is an expert resource and advocacy organization that monitors the care and protection of refugee women and children in existence since 1989. They speak out on behalf of refugee and displaced women, children and adolescents, attempting to draw the attention of governments and policy makers to significant social issues. The Women’s Refugee Commission provides unique opportunities for refugee women and adolescents to voice their concerns through government briefings, testimony, participation in field assessments and international conferences. Visit WRC for more information.

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a summer internship at the Women’s Refugee Commission in New York, NY.

The Women's Refugee Commission is an expert resource and advocacy organization that monitors the care and protection of refugee women and children in existence since 1989. They speak out on behalf of refugee and displaced women, children and adolescents, attempting to draw the attention of governments and policy makers to significant social issues. The Women's Refugee Commission provides unique opportunities for refugee women and adolescents to voice their concerns through government briefings, testimony, participation in field assessments and international conferences. Visit WRC for more information.

A $5,000 stipend is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Any student interested in pursuing a human rights internship experience is welcome to apply, but preference will be given to students with an expressed interest in the rights of women and children.

Chris served as an intern at the Women's Refugee Commission in New York City during the summer of 2014. He recently graduated from the University of Connecticut with degrees in both Political Science and Human Rights. Chris graduated with Honors in Human Rights
after completing his thesis on female participation in Indian politics. During his time on campus, Chris was heavily involved with the Alternative Breaks Program in the Office of Community Outreach. In addition to participating in seven Service Trips, he served as the Student Fundraising Coordinator of the program during his senior year. Following his sophomore year, Chris studied abroad in Guatemala as a part of the Social Entrepreneur Corps through the University of Connecticut. He spent eight weeks living with a host family while helping young business men and women develop strategies to better market socially conscious products such as water filters and clean-burning stoves. Upon completion of his internship, Chris hopes to continue working with a similar organization at the Women's Refugee Commission or to serve as a Teaching Assistant in New York Public Schools as part of the Blue Engine Program.

Bangalore Mediation Center

The Bangalore Mediation Centre Summer Internship is an eight-week learning immersion experience hosted at one of India’s most dynamic legal institutions, located in Bangalore (capital of the state of Karnataka), in southern India. The Centre was founded in 2007 as an initiative of the High Court of Karnataka, aimed at enhancing timely access to justice through the practice of alternative dispute resolution (ADR).

This fully funded internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a summer internship at the Bangalore Mediation Centre in Bangalore, India.

The Bangalore Mediation Centre Summer Internship is an eight-week learning immersion experience hosted at one of India’s most dynamic legal institutions, located in Bangalore (capital of the state of Karnataka), in southern India. The Centre was founded in 2007 as an initiative of the High Court of Karnataka, aimed at enhancing timely access to justice through the practice of alternative dispute resolution (ADR).

Students involved in this internship will observe first-hand the practice of alternative dispute resolution in a developing country context through daily involvement with the activities of the Centre.  Any student interested in pursuing an international internship experience is welcome to apply, but preference will be given to students pursuing an interest in India and/or alternative dispute resolution  in the legal system.

This is a fully funded summer internship, coordinated by the University of Connecticut's Human Rights Institute and supported by the Victor Schachter ’64 Rule of Law Award. Roundtrip air travel, local lodging and living expenses are covered during the eight-week internship period for students selected.

Christiane Rosenbaum is an LL.M student at the UCONN Law School from Germany. She is a licensed lawyer there and wrote her PhD dissertation about Mediation Laws in Europe (Germany and Spain). At UCONN she especially enjoyed participating in the Mediation Clinic, where she has gained practical experience in participating in mediations.
Prior to studying law in the United States, she has also had the chance to get to know the Spanish legal system, as she spent a year at a Spanish university. Upon graduating from the University of Connecticut Law School she plans on working in the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution.
RJ is a junior at the University of Connecticut double majoring in International Development and Human Rights. Last summer he traveled to Geneva, Switzerland with the help of a SURF (Summer Undergraduate Research Fund) award to conduct archival research on the 1926 Slavery Convention. On campus, RJ works and has worked at the UCONN Rainbow Center, Human Rights Institute, and the Thomas J. Dodd Center. For the past three years he and another student have been making a documentary on human trafficking and contemporary slavery. Upon graduation, RJ hopes to pursue a PhD in history and become a professor.

Jonathan Sykes, an undergraduate double majoring in Human Rights and Political Science

Sykes

Jon Sykes is a 9th semester undergraduate and one of early majors in Human Rights at the University of Connecticut. Prior to attendance at the University, Jon was a young activist for the rights of local homeless populations in Connecticut. Later, he joined the University of Connecticut’s PIRG chapter and organize events for its Hunger and Homelessness campaign. As his university social and academic career developed, he worked as a research assistant for the Sociology and Political Science departments, eventually finding a home with the staff of the HRI.

As a resident assistant, he devoted much of his time to aiding first year students during their transition period, and with that, an introduction into interpersonal conflict resolution. Jon went on to teach seminars to help students to solve conflicts with their peers at the University of Connecticut. With thee opportunity provided by the Victor Schacter ‘64 Rule of Law Award, Jon was able to apply the mediation procedures he learned as a resident assistant to a legal arena. This, coupled with the opportunity to explore the social and legal culture of India was intellectually fulfilling. For Jon, this was an opportunity to develop both as a scholar and as an individual, while immersing into an entirely new culture. After a period of 7 weeks traversing the Indian cities of Bangalore and Delhi, speaking with members of the Court ranging from office workers to High Court judges, Jon returned to the United States with a heightened enthusiasm for Political Science and Human Rights education.

Fernando Vieira Luiz, a LLM student in U.S. Legal Studies  at UConn School of Law. Fernando Vieira Luiz is a state judge in Santa Catarina, Brazil, and is currently working at the Electoral Appellate Court where he serves as the Goals Manager Judge of the Court. Fernando completed his LL.B. at the Federal University of Santa Catarina (Brazil), his LL.M. in Public Law at Estácio de Sá University (Brazil), and his LL.M. in U.S. Legal Studies at University of Connecticut School of Law. He also holds a Certificate in Judicial Management from South University of Santa Catarina (Brazil).

Lisa Y. Browne Browne Lisa Y. Browne is currently a second year student at the University of Connecticut School of Law where she serves as the Outreach Coordinator of the Public Interest Law Group and Vice President of the Military Law Society. She has over five years of experience implementing and coordinating humanitarian relief and development projects with the William J. Clinton Foundation, the United Nations and other international NGOs in Eastern Africa. Lisa completed her B.A. at Lake Forest College in International Relations and Business, an M.P.H. from Columbia University specializing in health policy and management, and holds a Certificate in International Healthcare Management from Yale University. She is currently a Research Assistant at the Program for Humanitarian and Conflict Research at Harvard University. Lisa is fluent in Hindi and Urdu.
Victor Schachter, Founder of the HRI Rule of Law Award

Vic Schachter Photo
Mr. Schachter is a partner of Fenwick & West LLP in California, where he practices labor and employment law and related litigation before federal and state courts. He is also an accomplished advocate and mediator in alternative dispute resolution matters. Mr. Schachter graduated UCONN in 1964 (Phi Beta Kappa), and New York University School of Law (1967). He has written and spoken extensively on a broad array of employment topics, and has appeared on many national radio and television programs. He has been selected for “The Best Lawyers in America” for over 20 years, repeatedly recognized as a “Northern California Super Lawyer,” and listed in California and International Who’s Who USA. Mr. Schachter has promoted alternate dispute resolution and judicial case management in Brazil, Turkey, Malaysia and India, and he was honored as a California Lawyer Attorney of the Year for his global pro bono work. Mr. Schachter is the Founder and President of the Foundation for Sustainable Rule of Law Initiatives, through which he continues international legal reform initiatives.

Internship Experience at the Bangalore Mediation Centre

This fully funded internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student completing a summer internship at the Bangalore Mediation Centre in Bangalore, India. Any student interested in pursuing an international internship experience is welcome to apply, but preference will be given to a student pursuing an interest in India and/or alternative dispute resolution (ADR) in the legal system. The Bangalore Mediation Centre (BMC) Summer Internship is a six-week learning immersion experience hosted at one of India's most dynamic legal institutions, located in Bangalore (capital of the state of Karnataka), in southern India. Students involved in this internship will observe first-hand the practice of ADR in the context of a developing country  through daily involvement with the activities of the Centre. For more information on the Bangalore Mediation Centre Summer Internship, please view the full description at the Study Abroad website. Applicants must submit an application through the Office of Study Abroad. A separate HRI Internship Award Application does not need to be submitted. Application deadline:   February 17

2012 Victor Schacter '64 Rule of Law Award

Meika Freeman Award funded participation in Cape Town Study Abroad program in Spring 2012.

Brittany Kerr Award funded participation in Cape Town Study Abroad program in Spring 2012.

2011 Victor Schachter '64 Rule of Law Award

Amber Albee Award funded student's participation in the Guatemala Social Entrepreneur Corps.

2010 Victor Schachter '64 Rule of Law Award

Jaclyn Russo Award funded student's participation in the International Human Rights Exchange program in Johannesburg, South Africa.

2009 Victor Schachter '64 Rule of Law Award

Chris Martin Award funded student's participation in a Summer Study Abroad and Internship program in Guatemala. Margaret McCarthy Award funded student's participation in a Summer Study Abroad and Internship program in Guatemala.

2008 Victor Schachter '64 Rule of Law Award

Lauren Donnelly Award funded student's participation in the International Human Rights Exchange program in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Lawyers Without Borders

This eight-week learning immersion experience is awarded to outstanding human rights undergraduate student and one student from the UConn School of Law completing an internship at Lawyers Without Borders in New Haven, CT. The selected students will have the opportunity to travel abroad with the Lawyers Without Borders team to facilitate Trial Advocacy Trainings for high-level judges and lawyers, the location will be determined closer to the date of departure, the possibilities include Kenya, Burkina Faso, Nepal or Tanzania. This internship will include a scholarship funded in part by the Vic Schachter ’64 Rule of Law Award, and will cover the travel costs, as well as some local expenses for the student’s time in New Haven, CT.

Lawyers Without Borders is a 501c3 charitable organization that harnesses the pro bono work of lawyers from around the world into volunteer service in global rule of law, capacity building and access to justice initiatives.

Students interested in human rights law, rule of law and trial advocacy training in an international context should consider this internship.

Iva Petkova photoIva Petkova is a rising senior at the University of Connecticut. She is double majoring in Political Science and Human Rights, with a minor in French. She is originally from Bulgaria and is very interested in traveling and learning languages. She spent the summer of 2013 studying abroad in Istanbul, Turkey, where she took a course on energy and sustainable development. Last summer, she was a legal intern at the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities, where she worked on multiple civil rights complaints. She conducted several mediations and investigations on wrongful termination complaints and got the opportunity to do legal writing.

During the summer of 2015, she will be interning at Lawyers Without Borders. While there, she will have the opportunity to travel to Tanzania with another intern and a senior lawyer from LWOB in order to conduct court observations and lay the groundwork for a future trial advocacy training program on human trafficking. She will also be conducting research on human trafficking and other human rights violations around the world and will work on creative projects to be used by LWOB in their international trainings.

At UConn, she has been involved with Community Outreach since her freshman year, first as a volunteer for the English as a Second Language Program and later as the Assistant Program Director of Cross Cultural Connections and the Program Director of the English as a Second Language Program. She has also been a UNESCO Student Ambassador for Human Rights since freshman year. During her junior year, she served as the President of the UConn Lawyers Without Borders Student Group, helping to organize a research project for UConn students, a talk by a human rights lawyer from LWOB, and bi-weekly discussions on timely human rights issues.

After graduating from UConn, she hopes to spend some time traveling and teaching English abroad. Afterward, she plans to go to law school, where she will focus on international human rights law, and eventually use her legal knowledge to work toward ensuring respect for the rights of all.

Freedom House

This internship is given to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student to complete a summer internship at Freedom House in Washington, DC.

This eight-week learning immersion experience is awarded to an outstanding human rights undergraduate student completing a summer internship at Freedom House in Washington, DC. A $5,000 scholarship is provided to assist with expenses related to the internship. Freedom House is a nonpartisan advocacy institution that has been in existence since 1941. Students involved in this internship will observe first-hand the practice of advocacy. When applying, students should specify if they are interested in working with Communications, Development or with the Africa Desk.

Students with an interest in advocacy for democracy and human rights around the world should consider this internship.

For more information, please see https://freedomhouse.org.

Atkin PhotoArthur Atkin is entering his 5th year at the University of Connecticut pursuing a double major in Political Science and Human Rights. Arthur is also aspiring to obtain his Masters in Public Administration (MPA) from UConn and is a part of University’s fast-track MPA program. This past summer (2015), Arthur interned on the Design, Monitoring and Evaluation team at Freedom House, located in Washington, D.C., from June to August.
Throughout high school and his first two years at UConn, Arthur was an active member of the Model United Nations club. He has also held several leadership positions as a member of the Greek community and as a brother of Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE) since the fall of his freshman year. These positions include serving as a Greek Peer Ambassador and the Inter-Fraternity Council’s Vice-President of Recruitment, and serving as his fraternity’s House manager, Homecoming Chairman and Philanthropy Chairman. Arthur has also been an employee at UConn’s Student Union since his sophomore year and currently works as a Building Manager at the Student Union, a position he was selected for in the spring of his 3rd undergraduate year.
In the future and after obtaining both his bachelor degrees in Political Science and Human Rights and Master’s degree in Public Administration from UConn, Arthur is working towards becoming a Foreign Services Officer for the U.S. State Department.

Andrew Oravecz is a rising senior at the University of Connecticut pursuing a double major in Political Science and Human Rights. Andrew worked as an external relations intern at Freedom House, located in Washington, D.C., from May through July 2014.

During his freshman year, Andrew was a member of the Leadership Learning Community where he sought to polish his practical and theoretical leadership skills. In fall of 2012, Andrew became a Resident Assistant in North campus where he served as a mentor, leader, and advocate for his floor and overall community. At the start of his junior year, Andrew moved to Alumni Quadrangle where he will again serve as Resident Assistant his senior year. In addition, during fall of 2013, Andrew conducted a significant research paper under the direction of Professor John Clifford. Looking through the lens of early American diplomacy, Andrew conducted research regarding the Hague Peace Conferences of 1899 where he sought to understand the balance of foreign policy interests and respect for human rights by the American delegation. Andrew came to the conclusion that, despite having few tangible accomplishments, the peace conferences served as a framework for future international agreements.

In spring 2014, Andrew interned in the Congressional Office of Representative Elizabeth Esty in Washington, D.C. Andrew contributed to the office by providing constituent services, attending briefings on behalf of staff, providing informative memos, and conducting policy research. While in Washington, Andrew also participated in a Foreign Policy and National Security program hosted by Partnership for a Secure America. Andrew was named one of eighteen scholars to contribute to the Back to Bipartisanship program which encompassed students from across the country.
In the future, Andrew hopes to study abroad to further understand the complexities of international relations. The intersection of foreign affairs, American diplomacy, and human rights is Andrew’s passion.

Coming Soon.

JohnsonTess Johnson is a rising senior at the University of Connecticut and was the first intern from the Human Rights Institute at Freedom House in Washington D.C. She worked with Freedom House from June through August 2012 as part of their sub-Saharan Africa programs.Since her freshman year, Tess has been a student in the University's Honors Program in the Department of Political Science. Tess has had the opportunity to do undergraduate research on two separate occasions, looking at public attitudes and behaviors about ethical consumption in the spring of 2011 and at the New England town meeting form of government in the state of Connecticut in the fall of 2011. Tess recently presented her research, "Public Views on Ethical Consumption," as part of the Social Sciences, Humanities, and Arts Research Experience (SHARE) at the 15th Annual Frontier in Undergraduate Research Poster Exhibition this April. Tess also hopes to be one of the first graduates of the new Human Rights major.

Tess has also worked as a student facilitator in the UConn Connects Program, which helps students on academic probation and other at-risk students to get back on track. Tess has also been active in the Arabic language program at the University.

Tess will be writing her Honors thesis beginning in the Fall of 2012 in conjunction with the Political Science Department and the Human Rights Institute with Dr. David Richards. Tess hopes to examine in depth the relationship between corporations and human rights. Upon graduation, Tess hopes to pursue a career in human rights after completing a program in either international affairs or law.