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Academic Programs

Current Graduate Course Offerings


Fall 2017 Course Offerings

CLAS Courses

HRTS 5301: Contemporary Debates in Human Rights
M 4:00-6:30pm
Mitoma
Key Debates in Human Rights will introduce students to the main modern debates in the academic field of human rights. It is interdisciplinary in scope, including recent intellectual contributions from philosophy, law, political science, sociology, anthropology, literature and history. It will address a number of central issues and questions, including the normative philosophical foundations of human rights, whether human rights are universal or relative, whether human rights can be held collectively, and the justifications for women's rights and cultural rights.

GERM 5345/CLCS 5317: Theater and Human Rights
We 2:45-5:30
Wogenstein
This seminar explores theatre and related performing arts as both forms of artistic expression and forms of public debate. The objective of the seminar is twofold: we will discuss the specific characteristics of modern and contemporary theatre by analyzing specific productions in light of theoretical positions (epic theatre, post-dramatic theatre etc.) and consider the impact of earlier drama (Greek tragedies, Bourgeois drama) on the present. Second, we aim to understand theatre’s engagement with human rights discourse and interventions in the public sphere. We will read and (whenever possible) watch performances or recordings of plays, study theoretical positions on theatre and human rights, and discuss related historical contexts. While the seminar pays particular attention to German theater, its approach is comparative in nature, and the works and theoretical texts we will discuss cover a variety of cultural backgrounds.

GERM 6480: German(y)—Africa(n): Dialogic Constructions of Self and Other in German Literature
Tu 4:00-7:00pm
von Hammerstein
German-speaking and African countries and populations have a long history of intercultural exchanges, often in the context of asymmetric power relations, both violent and non-violent. Along with other European powers, Germany and Austria participated in the colonial(ist) discourse since the Enlightenment. In the late nineteenth century Germany established colonies in Togo, Cameroon, German East Africa (today’s Tanzania, Ruanda, Burundi) and German Southwest Africa (today’s Namibia). The colonies were taken over by other colonial powers in the context of WWI. Germans have lived in various parts of Africa and people of African descent have lived in German-speaking countries. Over the centuries, the exchanges between them have manifested themselves in (inter)cultural – literary, artistic, photographic, and cinematographic – productions addressing, among others, human rights issues and violations.

Applying postcolonial, human rights and other theories, we will discuss concepts including: racism and apartheid (including intersections of racism and white feminism around 1900); gender discrimination (including rape); forms of violence (including war crimes and genocide) in a variety of contexts; transnationalism; intercultural and interracial contact zones; and the imperial gaze. We will investigate how the corresponding discourses are represented in select German-language texts of the Enlightenment, nineteenth century, colonial era around 1900, post-monarchy 1920s, Nazi era, post-WWII US occupation of West Germany, socialist East Germany, and since the 1990s in unified Germany. Select films will complement and enrich our discussions.

German-speaking students of Human Rights, Women, Sexuality and Gender Studies, Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, History, African Studies, and other programs are welcome.

POLS 5115: Theories of Human Rights
Tu 4:00-6:00pm
Arat

It is often argued that since the Second World War we have been living in the “age of human rights.”  Universal human rights have been articulated in and protected by proliferating international treaties, various demands for peace, justice and equality started to be framed as human rights issues, and the advocacy of human rights became a “full-time” job at bourgeoning institutions and organizations.  The study of human rights has not only permeated many fields, it has become an interdisciplinary field of study.  But, what are human rights?  Where do they come from?  Who has them?  Who can enjoy them?  Are there duties?  What comes first, rights or duties? Who are the duty bearers?   The course examines a range of answers presented since the ancient times and offers a survey of some major classical and contemporary theoretical debates.  It also links theoretical arguments to certain articulations of rights and responsibilities in international law or policy proposals.

This course meets the core requirements for the Political Theory subfield within Political Science, as well as for the Graduate Certificate in Human Rights.  It may count toward the International Relations subfield requirement, if the student’s writing assignments are arranged accordingly and with the approval of the instructor and graduate/undergraduate director.

This is a research seminar.  Thus, it requires all members to attend all seminar sessions and contribute to the content of the course by offering critical analyses of the assigned readings and by sharing their own research questions and findings.


Law Courses

Forthcoming


Social Work Courses

SWEL 5385: Human Rights and Social Work
Date/Time TBA
Instructor TBA
This course will provide the theoretical, conceptual, and practical foundation for social workers to engage in a human rights-based approach to social work.  Students will gain an understanding of the international human rights system, social work's contribution to achieving human rights, and how international human rights principles can be applied to social work practice.  We will use a number of cases from varied countries, including the United States, to examine how social workers can both advocate for and respect human rights in their work.

+Fall 2016

Fall 2016

CLAS Courses

ANTH 5305 Health and Human Rights
Willen
Th 12:20pm-2:45pm
Special topic readings or investigations according to the needs of each student.

ANTH 5377 Global Health and Anthropology
Erickson
W 3:35pm-5:25pm
Assessing global morbidity and mortality; global health governance; political economy of global health; health inequities; social determinants of health; syndemics; climate change and health; maternal and child health; nutrition; infectious diseases; and war, trauma, and complex emergencies.

ANTH 5390 Cultural Rights
Dussart
Tu 9:00am - 12:00pm
Politics of culture and cultural rights, minority rights, indigenous rights, multicultural policies, race, difference and law, cosmopolitanism, globalization and human rights.

HIST 5622 The Historical Literature of Latin America
Healey
Th 1:00pm-4:00pm
Course Description Forthcoming

GERM 6480 German(y)—Africa(n): Dialogic Constructions of Self and Other in German Literature
von Hammerstein
W 4:00pm-7:00pm
German­ speaking and African countries and populations have a long history of intercultural exchanges, often in the context of asymmetric power relations, both violent and non­-violent. Along with other European powers, Germany and Austria participated in the colonial(ist) discourse since the Enlightenment. In the late nineteenth century Germany established colonies in Togo,Cameroon, German East Africa (today’s Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi) and German Southwest Africa (today’s Namibia); they were taken over by other colonial powers in the context of WWI. Germans have lived in various parts of Africa and people of African descent have lived in German­ speaking countries. Over the centuries, the exchanges between them have manifested themselves in (inter)cultural – literary, artistic, photographic, and cinematographic – productions.
Applying postcolonial, human rights and other theories, we will discuss concepts including: racism and apartheid (including intersections of racism and white feminism around 1900); gender discrimination (including rape); forms of violence and human rights violations (including war crimes and genocide) in a variety of contexts; transnationalism; intercultural and interracial contact zones; and the imperial gaze. We will investigate how the corresponding discourses are represented in select German­ language texts of the Enlightenment, nineteenth century, colonial era around 1900, post­monarchy 1920s, Nazi era, post ­WWII US occupation of West Germany, socialist East Germany, and since the 1990s in unified Germany. Select films will complement and enrich our discussions.
German­ speaking students of Human Rights, Women, Sexuality and Gender Studies, Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, History, African Studies, and other programs are welcome.

HRTS 5301 Contemporary Debates in Human Rights
Mitoma
T 4:00 - 6:30pm
Key Debates in Human Rights will introduce students to the main modern debates in the academic field of human rights. It is interdisciplinary in scope, including recent intellectual contributions from philosophy, law, political science, sociology, anthropology, literature and history. It will address a number of central issues and questions, including the normative philosophical foundations of human rights, whether human rights are universal or relative, whether human rights can be held collectively, and the justifications for women's rights and cultural rights.

SOCI 5895 Investigating Special Topics: Contemporary Research in Human Rights
Holzer
W 12:20-3:20pm

Why do domestic actors commit to international human rights institutions? How do activists deploy human rights in action? Why do some issues get labeled “human rights violations” and not other? Explore some key human rights debates in the social sciences and develop your own empirical puzzle to pursue in human rights research. Each week, we will focus our reading and debate on a guiding question about a mechanism or social process relating to contemporary human rights. We will explore data sources at the Dodd Archives, and students with advanced statistics training are encouraged to contact HRI faculty and affiliates about using their unique datasets: CIRI Human Rights Data (Co-developed by David Richards, Department of Political Science), SERF Index: Economic and Social Rights Empowerment Initiative (Co-developed by Susan Randolph, Department of Economics), and Comparative Welfare Entitlements Data Set (Developed by Lyle Scruggs, Department of Political Science). By the end of the semester, you should have a complete first draft of an article-length submission on a topic related to human rights.

SPAN 6402 Studies in Spanish-American Literature
Irizarry
W 4:00pm-6:45pm
Course Description Forthcoming


Social Work Courses

SWEL 5385 Human Rights and Social Work
Libal
Sat 9:05am-4:05pm

This course will provide the theoretical, conceptual, and practical foundation for social workers to engage in a human rights-based approach to social work. Students will gain an understanding of the international human rights system, social work's contribution to achieving human rights, and how international human rights principles can be applied to social work practice. We will use a number of cases from varied countries, including the United States, to examine how social workers can both advocate for and respect human rights in their work.


Law Courses

LAW 7609 Clinic: Asylum and Human Rights
Bauer and Cabot
T 2:00pm-5:00pm
Students in this clinical program represent persons seeking political asylum in the United States. Asylum is available to individuals who can establish a well founded fear of persecution if returned to their home countries. Students exercise primary responsibility for all aspects of the asylum process, including proceedings in the Asylum Office of the Department of Homeland Security and hearings before Immigration judges. Students interview and counsel clients and investigate the facts supporting their claims, research human rights conditions in the client's home country, prepare supporting documentation and a brief in support of the asylum application, and represent clients at hearings and in related matters. Classroom seminars focus on the substantive and procedural law, both international and domestic, relevant to asylum claims, the lawyering skills that students will utilize in their cases, and the discussion of legal. tactical and ethical issues that arise in the context of the casework. This is a one semester clinic, but students have the opportunity to continue their work in subsequent semesters through Advanced Clinic Fieldwork. 9 credits (4 credits seminar, 5 credits fieldwork).

LAW 7672 Immigration Law
Redman
M 6:30pm-9:15pm
This course will provide a basic understanding of the issues and principles upon which U.S. immigration law is based as well as the policies underlying those principles. It will examine the legal and social aspects of this administrative agency-based field including visas, detention, exclusion, deportation, relief from deportation, judicial review, and citizenship by birth and naturalization. It will also expose students to the interplay of complex statutes and regulations, policy and ethics issues, international law, human rights law and constitutional law. It is about outsiders and therefore is a key part of the study of civil rights.

+ Spring 2017

Spring 2017

CLAS Courses

ENGL 6540: Seminar in Literature and Human Rights – Narratives of the Refugee Experience
Tu 9:30-12:00pm
Coundouriotis
The interdisciplinary study of literature and human rights discourse.

GERM 6480: Literature and Human Rights
We 3:00-5:45pm
Wogenstein
Course Description TBA

SOCI 5895: Women's Rights Are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women's Rights: Women, Gender, and Human Rights
M 3:30-6:30pm
Desai
“Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights,” entered the global human rights discourse at the Second UN World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna in 1993. In this seminar we will study the history of women’s mobilizing around the world that led to this articulation; how it has or has not influenced human rights theories and practices; and what it has meant for global gender justice specifically and social justice more generally.


NEAG School of Education Courses

EDCI 5830-002: Human Rights and Social Justice in Education
W 4:00-6:30pm
Mitoma
In this course, we will consider human rights and social justice as two overlapping, but non-identical frameworks for understanding educational institutions, practices, and objectives.


Social Work Courses

SWEL 5317: Women, Children, and Families: Social Policies and Programs
Tu 3:30-6:00pm
Feely
Focuses on the policies and programs that affect women and children, in particular income supports, maternal and child health, housing, domestic violence, foster care and adoption, and parenting and child maltreatment. Special attention will be paid to the legal rights of women and children, especially those who are immigrants, have disabilities, or are members of minority groups.

SWEL 5345: International Development
Fr/Sa 9:00am-5:00pm
This course addresses international relief, reconstruction and development -- theories and practice strategies to attack poverty and improve human well-being. Among the topics covered will be: building local capacity, developing local partnerships, use of appropriate technology to create sustainability, multi-sectoral work, cultural relevance, ensuring gender sensitive programming, understanding and working with local and national structures, funding streams, and international partnerships. Elective course for Substantive Area: Focused Area of Study on International Social Work.


Law Courses

LAW 7609: Clinic: Asylum and Human Rights
Tu 2:00-5:00pm
Cabot, Bauer
Students in this clinical program represent persons seeking political asylum in the United States. Asylum is available to individuals who can establish a well founded fear of persecution if returned to their home countries. Students exercise primary responsibility for all aspects of the asylum process, including proceedings in the Asylum Office of the Department of Homeland Security and hearings before Immigration judges. Students interview and counsel clients and investigate the facts supporting their claims, research human rights conditions in the client's home country, prepare supporting documentation and a brief in support of the asylum application, and represent clients at hearings and in related matters. Classroom seminars focus on the substantive and procedural law, both international and domestic, relevant to asylum claims, the lawyering skills that students will utilize in their cases, and the discussion of legal. tactical and ethical issues that arise in the context of the casework. This is a one semester clinic, but students have the opportunity to continue their work in subsequent semesters through Advanced Clinic Fieldwork. 9 credits (4 credits seminar, 5 credits fieldwork).

LAW 7653: European Human Rights
Tu 9:30-12:30pm
Janis
Is an introduction to the most advanced system of international law devoted to the protection of human rights. The course explores (1) the European Court and Commission of Human Rights and contrasts the European system to other forms of international legal process, and (2) the rights protected by the European Human Rights Law, e.g., protection against torture, respect for private and family life, freedom of expression, fair trial, and contrasts them to the rights protected in the United States and Canada.

LAW 7655: Employment Discrimination Law
TTH 3:30-5:00pm
Siegelman
This course focuses on a rapidly growing aspect of labor and employment law. The course introduces the concept of discrimination by examining Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, The Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Section 1981 of the Civil War Reconstruction Statutes. After exploring the process of proving and defending against individual and systematic discrimination claims, the course considers special problems in discrimination law that may include pregnancy, sexual harassment, sexual preference, religious discrimination and retaliation. The course also examines the alternative approach to discrimination adopted in the Americans with Disabilities Act. Fundamentals of statutory construction, litigation strategy, and statistical methods of proof are emphasized. Numerous unresolved issues are addressed throughout the course. Procedures and remedies may also be considered.

LAW 7679: International Law
W 6:30-9:15pm
Janis
This course is a study of the rules and adjudication of international law. Topics include customary international law, treaties, general principles of law and equity, the adjudication of international law by international courts, domestic courts, and international arbitration.

LAW 7695 Philosophy of Human Rights
W 6:30-9:15pm
Oquendo
This course will examine philosophical conceptions and critiques of human rights. It will consider the classical theories of rights developed by Locke and Rousseau and then the anti-rights positions of Betham and Marx. The discussion will then move to the contemporary accounts of Rawls, T.M. Scanlon, and Habermas and to the criticisms formulated by Richard Rorty and Bernard Williams.

LAW 7759: The Nuremberg Trials
TH 6:30-8:30pm
Birmingham
This seminar is a study of war crime trials held in the aftermath of World War II, in their legal and social contexts: from the law of the late Weimer Republic (c. 1928-1933) and the Third Reich (1933-1945); through the Nuremberg Trials (1945-1949) and that of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1961; to related domestic litigation under the Alien Tort Claims Act and otherwise.

LAW 7814: Refugee Law
F 9:30-12:30pm
Bauer
Millions of people worldwide are forced to flee their homes as a result of persecution, war, or other factors. This course will focus on legal responses to the problem of refugees, on both the international level and in United States law. The course will examine the development of international norms concerning the protection of refugees under the U.N Refugee Convention and Protocol and the Convention Against Torture, and consider in depth the laws and institutions that address claims for asylum and related forms of protection in the United States. The course will examine issues such as the legal standards for qualifying for refugee status, the challenges of assessing applicants' credibility, and the complex and controversial issues raised by the increasing numbers of refugees fleeing from gender-based harms (such as domestic violence, forced marriage, and female genital cutting) and gang violence.

LAW 7878: International Human Rights
TTH 2:00-3:30pm
Land
This course analyzes the essence of human rights in comparison with other rights of citizens. Human rights shall be considered from the viewpoint of international regulation (the United Nations Charter, Universal Declaration of Human Rights), regulation in different parts of the world and in different countries (United States of America, western European countries, Russia and eastern European countries). Concrete cases of human rights violations and concrete means of protecting human rights will be discussed.

LAW 7883: Human Rights and Post Conflict Justice
W 2:00-5:00pm
Wilson
How do countries cope with periods of massive human rights abuses committed in the past? What role should the international community play in promoting accountability and reconciliation for such abuses? What is the role of courts, either domestic or international, in such processes? Should countries pass amnesty laws and pardons for human rights offenders to facilitate the consolidation of democracy and should these laws be binding on international courts? This seminar will explore a range of approaches that countries have used, including truth commissions and criminal trials. The seminar will focus on a number of case studies, including South Africa, Guatemala, Rwanda and the Balkans, as well as the impact of international lawsuits such as the Pinochet extradition proceedings between Britain and Spain. We will look at the Rome Statute establishing the International Criminal Court and examine the issues raised by a court with its jurisdiction. Drawing on these examples, students will compare the advantages and disadvantages of international and domestic solutions in each context. Students will be required to write a short book review, a 6-8 page midterm paper and a final paper of 15-20 pages.

+Fall 2015

CLAS Courses

HRTS 5301 Contemporary Debates in Human Rights
Wilson
Tu 10:00am – 1:00pm
Key Debates in Human Rights will introduce students to the main modern debates in the academic field of human rights. It is interdisciplinary in scope, including recent intellectual contributions from philosophy, law, political science, sociology, anthropology, literature and history. It will address a number of central issues and questions, including the normative philosophical foundations of human rights, whether human rights are universal or relative, whether human rights can be held collectively, and the justifications for women’s rights and cultural rights.

HIST 5622 The Historical Literature of Latin America: Human Rights in the Late Twentieth Century
Silvestrini
W 2:30pm – 5:30pm
Description Forthcoming

HRTS 5899 Governance and Development in Sub-Saharan Africa
Abebe
Tu 12:00PM – 2:45PM
Description Forthcoming

PHIL 5315 Seminar in Moral Philosophy
Bloomfield
M 4:00pm – 6:30pm
A discussion and analysis of significant problems in ethical theory.

LAW COURSES

LAW 7592 Health and Human Rights (cross listed with PUBH 5497)
Chapman
Tu 5:30-8:30PM
This course will explore ways in which human health and well-being are interrelated with human rights. It will study and assess the basic components of governmental obligations related to health under international human rights law. In addition, the course will consider the human rights dimensions of a variety of public health issues, and it will identify the ways in which a human rights approach can be used as an advocacy tool to improve the policies that shape the public’s health.

LAW 7609: Asylum & Human Rights Clinic [open only to Law School students. only 3 credit classroom component counts towards Certificate]
Bauer & Cabot
Tu 2:00-5:00PM
Students in this clinical program represent persons seeking political asylum in the United States. Asylum is available to individuals who can establish a well-founded fear of persecution if returned to their home countries. Students exercise primary responsibility for all aspects of the asylum process, including proceedings in the Asylum Office of the Department of Homeland Security and hearings before Immigration judges. Students interview and counsel clients and investigate the facts supporting their claims, research human rights conditions in the client’s home country, prepare supporting documentation and a brief in support of the asylum application, and represent clients at hearings and in related matters. Classroom seminars focus on the substantive and procedural law, both international and domestic, relevant to asylum claims, the lawyering skills that students will utilize in their cases, and the discussion of legal. tactical and ethical issues that arise in the context of the casework. This is a one semester clinic, but students have the opportunity to continue their work in subsequent semesters through Advanced Clinic Fieldwork. 9 credits (4 credits seminar, 5 credits fieldwork).

LAW 7655: Employment Discrimination Law
Siegelman
M 6:30-9:15PM
This course focuses on a rapidly growing aspect of labor and employment law. The course introduces the concept of discrimination by examining Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, The Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Section 1981 of the Civil War Reconstruction Statutes. After exploring the process of proving and defending against individual and systematic discrimination claims, the course considers special problems in discrimination law that may include pregnancy, sexual harassment, sexual preference, religious discrimination and retaliation. The course also examines the alternative approach to discrimination adopted in the Americans with Disabilities Act. Fundamentals of statutory construction, litigation strategy, and statistical methods of proof are emphasized. Numerous unresolved issues are addressed throughout the course. Procedures and remedies may also be considered.

LAW 7679: International Law
Janis
TTH 3:30-6:30PM
This course is a study of the rules and adjudication of international law. Topics include customary international law, treaties, general principles of law and equity, the adjudication of international law by international courts, domestic courts, and international arbitration.

+Spring 2016

Spring 2016

CLAS Courses

EDCI 5094 Human Rights and Social Justice in Education

Mitoma

Th 4:00pm-6:30pm

In this course, we will consider human rights and social justice as two overlapping, but non-identical frameworks for understanding educational institutions, practices, and objectives. In general, human rights and social justice share a broad commitment to achieving more equitable, dignified, and progressive classrooms, schools, and communities. Even so, each of approaches is informed by different histories, contexts, and discourses, and have been pursued by different constituencies in different ways at different times. This course will provide students and opportunity to consider how human rights and social justice converge, diverge, and occasionally conflict when grappling with the challenges of teaching and learning, educational policy, and the broader social and political contexts of schooling.

 

ECON 5128 Economic Rights

Minkler

W 3:30pm-6:30pm

Economic rights include the right to an adequate standard of living, the right to work, and the right to basic income guarantees for those unable to work. These rights are grounded in international law - particularly the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights. This class will explore the conceptual bases, measurement, and policy applications of economic rights.

 

HRTS 5095/POLS 5010 Politics of Torture

Richards

W 1:30pm-4:00pm

This seminar examines: the political history and usage of torture; international torture law; related international legal institutions; how torturers are made; what torture victims experience; the politics of documenting evidence of torture; the ethics of torture as a security – related practice, and recent US usage of torture.

________________________________________

Social Work Courses

SWEL 5317 Women, Children, and Families: Policies and Programs

Libal

Sa 9:05am-5:05pm

Focuses on the policies and programs that affect women and children, in particular income supports, maternal and child health, housing, domestic violence, foster care and adoption, and parenting and child maltreatment. Special attention will be paid to the legal rights of women and children, especially those who are immigrants, have disabilities, or are members of minority groups.

 

SWEL 5385 Human Rights and Social Work

Berthold

F 9:05am-4:05pm

This course will provide the theoretical, conceptual, and practical foundation for social workers to engage in a human rights=based approach to social work. Students will gain an understanding of international human rights principles can be applied to social work practice. We will use a number of cases from varied countries, including the United States, to examine how social work can both advocate for and respect human rights in their work.

________________________________________

Law Courses

LAW 7695 Philosophy of Human Rights

Oquendo

TH 6:30-9:15pm

This course will examine philosophical conceptions and critiques of human rights. It will consider the classical theories of rights developed by Locke and Rousseau and then the anti-rights positions of Betham and Marx. The discussion will then move to the contemporary accounts of Rawls, T.M. Scanlon, and Habermas and to the criticisms formulated by Richard Rorty and Bernard Williams.

 

LAW 7814 Refugee Law

Bauer

TH 9:30-12:30pm

Millions of people worldwide are forced to flee their homes as a result of persecution, war, or other factors. This course will focus on legal responses to the problem of refugees, on both the international level and in United States law. The course will examine the development of international norms concerning the protection of refugees under the U.N Refugee Convention and Protocol and the Convention Against Torture, and consider in depth the laws and institutions that address claims for asylum and related forms of protection in the United States. The course will examine issues such as the legal standards for qualifying for refugee status, the challenges of assessing applicants' credibility, and the complex and controversial issues raised by the increasing numbers of refugees fleeing from gender-based harms (such as domestic violence, forced marriage, and female genital cutting) and gang violence.

 

LAW 7883 Human Rights and Post Conflict Justice

Wilson

T 2:00-5:00pm

How do countries cope with periods of massive human rights abuses committed in the past? What role should the international community play in promoting accountability and reconciliation for such abuses? What is the role of courts, either domestic or international, in such processes? Should countries pass amnesty laws and pardons for human rights offenders to facilitate the consolidation of democracy and should these laws be binding on international courts? This seminar will explore a range of approaches that countries have used, including truth commissions and criminal trials. The seminar will focus on a number of case studies, including South Africa, Guatemala, Rwanda and the Balkans, as well as the impact of international lawsuits such as the Pinochet extradition proceedings between Britain and Spain. We will look at the Rome Statute establishing the International Criminal Court and examine the issues raised by a court with its jurisdiction. Drawing on these examples, students will compare the advantages and disadvantages of international and domestic solutions in each context. Students will be required to write a short book review, a 6-8 page midterm paper and a final paper of 15-20 pages.

+Fall 2014

CLAS Courses

HRTS 5301 Contemporary Debates in Human Rights
Mitoma
W 10:10AM-1:10PM

ANTH 5315 Gender and Culture
Linnekin
M 10:00AM-12:45PM

GERM 6480 Deutschland -Afrika(nerInnen)
von Hammerstein
W 4:00-7:00PM
*Note: This class is taught in German, not English

POLS 5322 Assessing Human Security
Richards
W 1:30-4:00PM

SOCI 5895 Contemporary Development
Desai
Th 3:30-6:30PM

School of Social Work Course

SWEL 5385 Human Rights and Social Work
Libal
F 9:00AM-5PM, meeting on 9/5, 10/3, 11/7, and 12/5

 CLAS Courses

HRTS 5301 Contemporary Debates in Human Rights
Mitoma
W 10:10AM-1:10PM

ANTH 5315 Gender and Culture
Linnekin
M 10:00AM-12:45PM

GERM 6480 Deutschland -Afrika(nerInnen)
von Hammerstein
W 4:00-7:00PM
*Note: This class is taught in German, not English

POLS 5322 Assessing Human Security
Richards
W 1:30-4:00PM

SOCI 5895 Contemporary Development
Desai
Th 3:30-6:30PM

School of Social Work Course

SWEL 5385 Human Rights and Social Work
Libal
F 9:00AM-5PM, meeting on 9/5, 10/3, 11/7, and 12/5

Law Courses

LAW 7609-01: Clinic: Asylum and Human Rights
Bauer
Tu 2:00-5:00PM

LAW 7672 Immigration Law
Redman
M 6:30-9:15PM

LAW 7679 International Law
Janis
M/W 9:30-11:00AM

LAW 7838 Advanced Constitutional Law: Individual Rights
Barnes
W 9:30AM-12:30PM

Law Courses

LAW 7609-01: Clinic: Asylum and Human Rights
Bauer
Tu 2:00-5:00PM

LAW 7672 Immigration Law
Redman
M 6:30-9:15PM

LAW 7679 International Law
Janis
M/W 9:30-11:00AM

LAW 7838 Advanced Constitutional Law: Individual Rights
Barnes
W 9:30AM-12:30PM

+Spring 2015

CLAS Courses

ANTH 5305 Dignity & Health

Willen

Th 2:30pm-5:15pm

Interest in dignity has grown like gangbusters in the past half-decade, especially in the fields of political philosophy, bioethics, law, and human rights. As debates have raged, however, anthropologists, for the most part, have remained quiet. Some might find this anthropological silence strange. Doesn’t our field presume an incipient link among all ἄνθρωποι (anthropoi), whether wealthy or indigent, modal or transgressive, living or dead? If so, might something like dignity not name that link? In this course, we will consider how, and why, the notion of dignity has become so central a preoccupation in other fields as a first step toward launching an explicitly anthropological inquiry into the topic. Although our readings will range widely across fields and domains of human experience, the central thematic focus for the course will be the relationship between dignity and experiences of health, illness, and bodies (living and dead; human as well as non-human).

ANTH 5377 International Health

Erickson

Tu 5:00-7:45 pm

The role of anthropology in international health, morbidity and mortality, population, maternal and child health, nutrition, infectious diseases and epidemiology, health care infrastructure and underdevelopment.

ECON 5128 Economic Rights

Minkler

M/W 4:40pm – 5:55pm

Economic rights include the right to an adequate standard of living, the right to work, and the right to basic income guarantees for those unable to work. These rights are grounded in international law—particularly the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights. This class will explore the conceptual bases, measurement, and policy applications of economic rights.

ENGL 6540 Seminar in Literature and Human Rights

Coundouriotis

Tu 9:30am-12:00pm

The interdisciplinary study of literature and human rights discourse.

HRTS 5095 Teaching Human Rights

Mitoma

M 1:25pm-2:15pm

Special Topics

POLS 5105 Theory of Human Rights

Arat

We 4:00pm-6:30pm

It is often argued that since the Second World War we have been living in the “age of human rights.” Universal human rights have been articulated in and protected by proliferating international treaties, various demands for peace, justice and equality started to be framed as human rights issues, and the advocacy of human rights became a “full-time” job at bourgeoning institutions and organizations. The study of human rights has not only permeated many fields, it has become an interdisciplinary field of study. But, what are human rights? Where do they come from? Who has them? Who can enjoy them? Are there duties? What comes first, rights or duties? Who are the duty bearers? The course examines a range of answers presented since the ancient times and offers a survey of some major classical and contemporary theoretical debates. It also links theoretical arguments to certain articulations of rights and responsibilities in international law or policy proposals.

SOCI 5895 Human Rights

Holzer

Mo 3:30pm-6:30pm

Explore some key human rights debates in the social sciences and develop your own empirical puzzle to pursue in human rights research. Each week, we will focus our reading and debate on a guiding question about a mechanism or social process relating to contemporary human rights (e.g. Why do domestic actors commit to international human rights institutions? Why do some issues get labeled “human rights violations” and not other?). We will explore data sources at the Dodd Archives, and students with advanced statistics training are encouraged to contact HRI faculty and affiliates about using their unique datasets: CIRI Human Rights Data (Co-developed by David Richards, Department of Political Science), SERF Index: Economic and Social Rights Empowerment Initiative (Co-developed by Susan Randolph, Department of Economics), and Comparative Welfare Entitlements Data Set (Developed by Lyle Scruggs, Department of Political Science). By the end of the semester, you should have a complete first draft of an article-length submission on a topic related to human rights.

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Law Courses

LAW 7653 European Human Rights

Janis

Th 9:30am-12:30pm

Is an introduction to the most advanced system of international law devoted to the protection of human rights. The course explores (1) the European Court and Commission of Human Rights and contrasts the European system to other forms of international legal process, and (2) the rights protected by the European Human Rights Law, e.g., protection against torture, respect for private and family life, freedom of expression, fair trial, and contrasts them to the rights protected in the United States and Canada.

LAW 7655 Employment Discrimination Law

Siegelman

TTH 9:00am-10:30am

This course focuses on a rapidly growing aspect of labor and employment law. The course introduces the concept of discrimination by examining Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, The Age Discrimination in Employment Act and Section 1981 of the Civil War Reconstruction Statutes. After exploring the process of proving and defending against individual and systematic discrimination claims, the course considers special problems in discrimination law that may include pregnancy, sexual harassment, sexual preference, religious discrimination and retaliation. The course also examines the alternative approach to discrimination adopted in the Americans with Disabilities Act. Fundamentals of statutory construction, litigation strategy, and statistical methods of proof are emphasized. Numerous unresolved issues are addressed throughout the course. Procedures and remedies may also be considered.

LAW 7722 International Law and Human Rights Clinic

LAW 7755 Accountability and Compliance in Criminal and International Law

de Figueiredo

W 10:30am-12:30pm

This seminar examines accountability and compliance challenges in criminal and international law. The course will begin by unpacking the terms "accountability' and "compliance." Dictionary definitions of accountability typically involve the condition of being liable, answerable, or responsible. Yet, when applied to criminal and international law, understanding (1) who monitors the action, (2) who is liable for a behavior, (3) the processes and standards for which the accountable behavior is judged, and (4) the effects of breaching those standards, the situation becomes more complex. After discussing the conceptualization of accountability and compliance, the course will address the difficulties of achieving accountability (and thus, liability) in the international system, a setting where, in certain cases, the rule of law is weak. Specific attention will be given to challenges in achieving domestic enforcement with international law, obtaining compliance with international courts, and in increasing accountability with human rights. The course will then examine challenges in international and domestic criminal law, giving students close exposure to static and dynamic theories of deterrence, and focusing on the challenge of regulating crimes of addiction. Although the readings will draw primarily from legal scholarship, they will include works from political science that shed light on topics such as the design of international institutions, the relationship between international and domestic law, and the role of reputation in the international system. Readings in philosophy and economics that lay the groundwork for deterrence will also be discussed. A research paper is required. Suggested Preparation: Criminal Law, International Law, Law and Economics

LAW 7759 The Nuremburg Trials

Birmingham

Th 6:30pm-8:30pm

This seminar is a study of war crime trials held in the aftermath of World War II, in their legal and social contexts: from the law of the late Weimer Republic (c. 1928-1933) and the Third Reich (1933-1945); through the Nuremberg Trials (1945-1949) and that of Adolf Eichmann in Jerusalem in 1961; to related domestic litigation under the Alien Tort Claims Act and otherwise.

LAW 7878 International Human Rights

Land

MW 2:00pm-3:30pm

This course analyzes the essence of human rights in comparison with other rights of citizens. Human rights shall be considered from the viewpoint of international regulation (the United Nations Charter, Universal Declaration of Human Rights), regulation in different parts of the world and in different countries (United States of America, western European countries, Russia and eastern European countries). Concrete cases of human rights violations and concrete means of protecting human rights will be discussed.

LAW 7815 Worker’s Rights in a Global Economy

Murray

W 5:00pm-8:00pm

This is a course on international labor law as an important feature of the global economy. The course deals with issues of trade, human rights and labor rights in the context of international organizations such as the International Labor Organization (ILO) the United Nations, the World Trade Organization (WTO) and regional trade agreements, such as NAFTA, which maintain labor side agreements,as well as the enforcement of worker rights in the European Union (EU). The course also will look at soft law areas such as corporate codes of conduct among large American companies like Wal-Mart, Nike, Levi-Strauss, and Apple and how well (or poorly) such voluntary enforcement regimes impact the rights of workers producing goods for the world market. The course will also examine litigation involving international labor standards as well as cross-border organizing and collective bargaining involving workers, their unions and the global concerns for which they work. Finally the course will pay particular attention to the issues of women and children as workers in the global economy and efforts to protect them through the use of international labor standards and enforcement mechanisms. A prerequisite for this course is Labor Law or any course dealing with international law or international trade.

LAW 7883 Human Rights and Post Conflict Justice

Richards

W 6:30pm-9:15pm

How do countries cope with periods of massive human rights abuses committed in the past? What role should the international community play in promoting accountability and reconciliation for such abuses? What is the role of courts, either domestic or international, in such processes? Should countries pass amnesty laws and pardons for human rights offenders to facilitate the consolidation of democracy and should these laws be binding on international courts? This seminar will explore a range of approaches that countries have used, including truth commissions and criminal trials. The seminar will focus on a number of case studies, including South Africa, Guatemala, Rwanda and the Balkans, as well as the impact of international lawsuits such as the Pinochet extradition proceedings between Britain and Spain. We will look at the Rome Statute establishing the International Criminal Court and examine the issues raised by a court with its jurisdiction. Drawing on these examples, students will compare the advantages and disadvantages of international and domestic solutions in each context. Students will be required to write a short book review, a 6-8 page midterm paper and a final paper of 15-20 pages.</div>